Historical Civil War Autographs
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39 Items.  Showing Items 1 thru 20.
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BLAIR, MONTGOMERY (1813-83)

# 6940

U.S. Postmaster General - 1861-64; Brother of Francis P. Blair, Jr.; Mayor of St. Louis – 1842-43; Counsel for Dred Scott before the U.S. Supreme Court

War-Date Signed Envelope, 3 ¼” x 6”, free-franked as U.S. Postmaster General under President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, “M. Blair, P.M.G.” The envelope is also addressed by Blair, to “Col[onel] F.A. Dick, St. Louis, Mo.,” and is postmarked “Washington, D.C., May 8, 1863.”

The envelope is lightly toned, with minor wear and a few superficial tears at the edges, along with several small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CAMERON, SIMON (1799-1889)

# 6941

U.S. Secretary of War - 1861-62

As a contender for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1860, Cameron threw his support to Lincoln when promised a cabinet seat. His brief tenure as Secretary of War was so marked by corruption that he was forced to resign in 1862.

Signature, “Simon Cameron,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a small tear at the upper edge, well away from the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewCAMERON, SIMON (1799-1889)

# 7846

U.S. Secretary of War – 1861-62, during the American Civil War; U.S. Senator – Pennsylvania – 1845-49, 1857-61 & 1867-77

Autograph Letter Signed, 7 ¾” x 9 ¾”. In this early letter, Cameron recommends a Dr. Charles Moswell for appointment as assistant surgeon in the U.S. Navy to Navy Secretary Mahlon Dickerson.


                                                                                                                                               Middleton, Penn[sylvani]a
                                                                                                                                                           Aug[ust] 11, 1835.

Sir,

I have been requested by Mr. Jno. C. Boyd, a highly respectable citizen of North county, to write you in behalf of Dr. Chas. D. Moswell, who is an applicant for the situation [of] Assistant Surgeon in the Navy. I have not the pleasure of a personal acquaintance with Mr. Moswell, but from the character of his connections in the State, and the representations of Mr. Boyd, I feel confident that the appointment would be a good one, and I should be much gratified if he could succeed.

                                                                                                                                                Very respectfully,
                                                                                                                                                           Simon Cameron


The integral leaf is also addressed by Cameron, to “Hon[orable] M. Dickerson, Secretary Navy, Washington C[i]ty, D.C.” In very good condition overall, the letter has somewhat heavier toning at the right edge, numerous tiny ink stains, a few nicks at the edges, and the usual folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 6942

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war, and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

Inscribed Signature, as antebellum Governor of Ohio, “For Geo[rge] M. Fowler, Esq[uire]. I have the honor to be Very respectfully Yours & c., S.P. Chase, Columbus, Ap[ri]l 24, 1857,” on a 5” x 7” sheet of embossed stationery. A period engraved image, cut into an oval shape, has been affixed to the upper right corner.

The sheet has light soiling and wear, along with the expected folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 7045

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

War-Date Signature, with closing and title in another hand, “S.P. Chase,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a letter as U.S. Treasury Secretary, the position Chase held from March 4, 1861 through December 6, 1864; with the pencil notation, “1862” in the lower margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewCLAY, CASSIUS MARCELLUS (1810-1903)

# 7840

Union Major General – Kentucky

Though from an aristocratic, slave-holding Kentucky family, Clay established an antislavery newspaper, The True American, in Lexington, Kentucky in 1845. A Mexican War veteran and prominent Republican Party figure, he declined a general’s appointment due to Lincoln’s refusal to abolish slavery in the early Civil War years. Appointed by Lincoln, Clay served as U.S. Minister to Russia, 1861-62 and 1863-69.

Autograph Quotation Signed, with desirable full signature on a 3 ¼” x 4 ¼” slip of blue paper, imprinted “The Lincoln Collection of Autographs. Started by Mr. Lincoln in 1863. JOHN SPARHAWK WURTS, PHILADELPHIA,” in the upper left corner, including Clay’s handwritten attribution to the assassinated sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln.


“White Hall, K[entuck]y, Au[gust] 5, 1897. ‘If Slavery is not wrong Nothing is wrong’ A.L. Cassius Marcellus Clay.”


Exceptional and flawless.

OUT OF STOCK
 

DENNISON, WILLIAM (1815-82)

# 6943

U.S. Postmaster General – 1864-66; Governor of Ohio – 1860-62

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ¼”, “W. Dennison,” with the notation “Post Master General, Feb. 10th 1866in another hand beneath.

Lightly and evenly toned, with mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ELLSWORTH, EPHRAIM ELMER (1837-61)

# 7024

Union Colonel – Raised the 11th New York Infantry – “Ellsworth’s Fire Zouaves”

A personal friend of President Lincoln, Ellsworth became an instant hero to the Union when he was shot by proprietor James T. Jackson while removing the Confederate flag from the Marshall House Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia on May 24, 1861. Jackson was, in turn, immediately shot and killed by Zouave Private Francis E. Brownell, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the action.

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with initials, "E.E.E.,” on the reverse of a Terpsichorean Club card of the U.S. Zouave Cadets, probably relating to a formal dance sponsored by the unit.

The card is accompanied by a printed forty-page booklet, 3 ½” x 5 ¼”, enumerating the terms of drill and many other details of the Zouaves’ history and of their “Proposed Tour of the United States.” Strictly drilled and held to the most rigorous standards of military and personal discipline, their gaudy uniforms fashioned after those of the French colonial troops in Algeria, the unit achieved national renown as an exhibition while touring the northeastern United States.

The text of the back cover, Chicago, Ill., Sept, 20th 1859,” along with several pages of press notices dating from mid 1859 through May 1860, associate the booklet and card to Ellsworth’s time in Illinois, where he trained the Chicago National Guard Cadets, later known as the U.S. Zouave Cadets. Having studied in the law office of Abraham Lincoln during his time in Illinois, Ellsworth became a personal friend of the Lincoln family. He campaigned tirelessly for Lincoln in the election of 1860, and accompanied the new President to Washington, D.C. for the inauguration.

Both pieces bear general soiling and wear; having heavier staining on the covers, the booklet contains all its original pages, legible and unmarred.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6860

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Signed Card, 2” x 4 ¼”, “Edward Everett.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a few stains, and there is glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6995

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Autograph Letter Signed, 6 ½” x 8”, to “Mrs. J.L. Payson.” From his home in Boston, Everett amusingly responds to a request for autographs, presumably those of Rufus Choate, Thomas Hart Benton, and Washington Irving – no longer present with this letter.

“Summer Street, 23 Nov[ember] 1854. Dear Mrs. Payson, After my former note was written, it occurred to me to send you the autographs of Mr. Choate, and Col. Benton, in addition to that of Mr. Irving; a group certainly of which the members have nothing in common, but that they are all celebrities. With the greatest Regard, Sincerely Yours, Edward Everett.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the expected folds. There are two tears, with no loss of paper, in the lower left corner, along with damp-staining along the right margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FESSENDEN, WILLIAM P. (1806-69)

# 6944

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1864-65; U.S. Senator – Maine – 1854-69

Signature, as U.S. Senator, “W.P. Fessenden, U[nited] S[tates] S[enate],” on a 1” x 3” slip paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 6945

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signature, “H. Hamlin, Maine,” on a 2 ¾” x 4 ¾” portion of a lightly toned album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 7001

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¼”, with a full signature, Hannibal Hamlin, Bangor, Ap[ri]l 18, 1891,” from Hamlin’s home in Maine, less than three months before his death.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6880

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4 ¼”, “John Hay.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6946

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois, and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4”, “John Hay.”

Pristine, both front and reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6714

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, on the first and third leaves of a 5 ¼” x 8” letter-sheet. Addressing former Union General Frederick Tracy Dent, brother-in-law and secretary of President Ulysses S. Grant, Hay seeks the help of the President in securing his brother’s advancement in the military.

New York, August 31 [no year]. My Dear General Dent, Enclosed you will find the note to the President which you suggested I should write. My brother Lieutenant Leonard Hay is Adjutant of the 9th Infantry. He likes the service and desires to remain in it. I know him to be a very efficient and valuable officer and if you can do anything to promote his wishes, I am sure it will be to the advantage of the service, and will lay me under great personal obligations. I am very faithfully yours, John Hay. P.S. My address will be for the present ‘Republican Office, Chicago’ where I am always at your disposition.”

Beneath Hay’s closing and signature, General Dent has written and initialed a biographical notation of Hay, in pencil, “Private Sec[retary] of President Lincoln and author of Jim Beldsoe & little breeches. F.T.D.”

The letter-sheet bears the usual light toning, and there is weakness and clean separation, with no loss of paper, at the edges of two horizontal folds. The text of the letter is unaffected by a three-quarter inch area of paper loss in the upper margin of the second page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HELM, BENJAMIN HARDIN (1831-63)

# 6814

Confederate Brigadier General – Kentucky; Brother-in-Law of Abraham Lincoln

A West Point graduate, attorney, and antebellum Kentucky state legislator, Helm married the half sister of Mary Todd Lincoln in 1856. When the Civil War broke out five years later, he declined a position in the Federal Army, offered by President Lincoln; instead joining the Confederate cause, Helm organized and led the 1st Kentucky Cavalry. Promoted brigadier general just before the battle of Shiloh, Helm saw action at Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, and Chickamauga, where he was mortally wounded while leading a brigade under Confederate Major General John C. Breckinridge in the Army of Tennessee.

War-Date Signature, “B.H. Helm, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Com[man]d[ing],” an extremely rare example on a 1 ½” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewHORNER, HENRY (1878-1940)

# 7773

First Jewish Governor of Illinois – 1933-40 – Died in Office

Noted collector of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia, his collection was bequeathed to the people of Illinois, and now resides at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Illinois

A noted Lincoln collector writes to a colleague

Typed Letter Signed, on imprinted 8 ¼” x 10 ½” stationery as Illinois Governor, to fellow Lincoln authority Emanuel Hertz, also Jewish, the brother of Chief Rabbi J.H. Hertz of England.


“August 9, 1937. Honorable Emanuel Hertz, 141 Broadway, Borough of Manhattan, New York City, N.Y. Dear Emanuel: This acknowledges your letter of August sixth. I surely would like to see the photostats you mention. When you are out this way you can give me a ring and I shall be glad to talk to you about them or you can let me look at them by mailing them to me. I hope you are well and have the best of good luck. Sincerely, Henry Horner.


The letter has heavier, somewhat irregular toning at the upper right edge, and there are two horizontal folds.

Price: $60.00
Quantity: 
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6379

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

A Request for a Lieutenant’s Promotion – Just Two Months Before He was Mortally Wounded at Cedar Creek

Civil War-Date Autograph Note Signed, as President on a 5” x 8” sheet of Executive Mansion stationery, beneath a request from F.H. Baldwin for the promotion of his brother, a lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Artillery.

“The above, written by a very good man, is submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln.”

Noted as a resident of Allentown, Pennsylvania in the accompanying National Archives records, Mr. Baldwin was undoubtedly a caller at the Executive Mansion, and was directed to write his request, hoping that President Lincoln would approve and advance it through the proper channels. His letter, accomplished in pencil, in full:

Aug. 12th 1864. To His Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the U.S. I desire the transfer or promotion of my brother, Lt. Henry M. Baldwin, Battery M, 5th Reg[imen]t U.S. Artillery, to any vacancy in the Regt. which you may decide it possible to place him, consistent with the good of the service. Very Resp[ectfull]y, F.H. Baldwin.”

There is no record of Lieutenant Baldwin’s promotion or transfer before he was severely wounded through the chest and left arm on October 19, 1864 – just two months later - at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He died on November 8, 1864 at Sheridan Hospital, near Winchester, Virginia.

The letter is in excellent condition, with creases from two vertical folds.                                                                                      

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6678

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Document Signed, 15” x 19”, as President, Washington, July 29, 1861, “Abraham Lincoln,” a partly printed appointment for “…Stephen Brooks…Surveyor of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Countersigned by the Secretary of the Treasury, “S.P. Chase.”

The document is in excellent overall condition, with light age toning and several minor paper breaks at the intersections of the usual folds. Both signatures are distinct and free from flaw in every respect.

OUT OF STOCK
 
39 Items.  Showing Items 1 thru 20.
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