Historical Civil War Autographs
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Presidents & First Ladies

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48 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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HOOVER, LOU HENRY (1874-1944)

# 6533

U.S. First Lady - 1929-33

Signed White House Card, 2 ¾” x 4 ¼”, as First Lady, “Lou Henry Hoover.”

Overall condition is very good, both front and reverse, with light, even toning and an area or two of very minor soiling.

The card is sold with the transmittal envelope and a typed letter from Mrs. Hoover’s secretary, dated January 27, 1933, sending the autograph. Both pieces bear White House embossing and the typewritten address, “Mrs. J.G. McCreery, East Lawn Sanitarium, Northville, Michigan.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

JACKSON, ANDREW (1767-1845)

# 6025

Seventh U.S. President - 1829-37

Franked Panel, 8” x 10”, “Free, Andrew Jackson,” also addressed by Jackson, to “Major A.J. Donelson, Charge de Affairs from the U[nited] States to the Republic of Texas. By pr[ivate] Waggoner [sic] or Bearer of Dispatches – to the care of Capt. Easthorn, merchant New Orleans.”

A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy in 1820, Andrew Jackson Donelson served as aide-de-camp to his uncle, General Andrew Jackson, during his term as Governor of the Florida Territory and as private secretary to the President during Jackson’s two terms in office. Appointed U.S. Charge d’Affaires to the Republic of Texas in 1844, Donelson was instrumental in the negotiations which resulted in the admission of the state of Texas to the Union in 1845. This hand-carried cover can thus be dated to that period, and the importance of the letter it carried from the former President is a matter upon which we can only speculate.

Light soiling and wear, particularly along the usual folds; numerous tears and breaks, along with paper loss associated with the opening of the wax seals have been professionally repaired on reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JACKSON, ANDREW (1767-1845)

# 6693

Seventh U.S. President - 1829-37

A Double-Signed Check, as President

Document Signed, 2 ¾” X 7”, as President, Washington, August 24, 1835, “Andrew Jackson,” a partly printed check, also accomplished by Jackson. Drawn on the Bank of the Metropolis for $200, the check is made payable to Jackson’s son, “Andrew Jackson, j[u]n[io]r,” and thus bears a second full signature.

The check is lightly and evenly toned, with several folds and light creases. A cross-cut cancellation at center intersects portions of the upper signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JEFFERSON, THOMAS (1743-1826)

# 6189

Third U.S. President - 1801-09

MADISON, JAMES (1751-1836)
Fourth U.S. President - 1809-17


Partial Document Signed
, as President, “Th: Jefferson,” a 5 ¾” x 8 ½” portion of a four-language ship’s paper, issued at Baltimore, December 22, 1807. Countersigned by the Secretary of State, “James Madison.”

Several light creases, one passing through Jefferson’s signature, with paper loss in the blank left margin, well away from the signatures and text.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JEFFERSON, THOMAS (1743-1826)

# 6492

Third U.S. President - 1801-09

Autograph Note Signed, 3” x 6 ¼”, a personal, handwritten dinner invitation. Although the year is unstated, the note can probably be traced to 1814, one of only two years after Jefferson’s presidency when the seventh day of November fell on a Monday. The other was 1825, the final year of his life.

“Th: Jefferson asks the favor of Mr. Davis to dine at Monticello tomorrow (Tuesday). Monday, Nov. 7.”

Bearing light soiling and wear, along with several fold lines and creases, the note has been affixed to a 7 ¾” x 9 ¾” sheet, with the manuscript notation, “Thos. Jefferson, Signer Declaration of Independence & President U. States,” above. There is show-through of the recipient’s name, “Mr. Davis,” also in Jefferson’s hand, from the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JOHNSON, LYNDON BAINES (1908-1973)

# 7663

Thirty-Sixth U.S. President 1963-69; U.S. Vice President – 1961-63

Signed Program, 4” x 6”, as President, “Lyndon B. Johnson.” The program is for a White House event in honor of the President of the Philippines on October 5, 1964, featuring The Harkness Ballet.

The heavy paper is lightly and evenly toned, with superficial wear and soiling.

Price: $495.00
Quantity: 
 

KENNEDY, JOHN F. (1917-63)

# 6559

Thirty-Fifth U.S. President – 1960-63

Typed Letter Signed, as President on 7” x 10 ½” White House stationery, to “Honorable Edmund G. Brown, Governor of California, Sacramento, California.”

In expressing appreciation for Governor Brown’s cooperation in support of a house bill to preserve California’s salmon and steelhead trout resources, President Kennedy gives voice to the spirit of conservation, for both domestic and strategic purposes, that would define American policy for almost two decades.

Washington, August 21, 1962. Dear Governor Brown: Your letter regarding the Administration’s program for the preservation and enhancement of our individual natural resources is highly appreciated. The legislative proposal, as contained in H.R. 11356 and identical bills, would authorize the Secretary of the Interior, in cooperation with your Department of Fish and Game, to take appropriate action to preserve and develop the salmon and steelhead trout and other fishery resources of the streams entering the Pacific Ocean from the State of California. These resources, vital to California’s economy, are of national concern. It is imperative that they be given adequate protection and, where possible, increased in abundance. The program will strengthen our hand in international negotiations, and advance our long-range plans for fishery conservation. We are pleased, therefore, to know that you are solidly behind Mr. Miller’s bill. Sincerely, John Kennedy.”

There are two light horizontal folds, a few staple holes in the upper margin, and several filing stamps and handwritten notations.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6379

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

A Request for a Lieutenant’s Promotion – Just Two Months Before He was Mortally Wounded at Cedar Creek

Civil War-Date Autograph Note Signed, as President on a 5” x 8” sheet of Executive Mansion stationery, beneath a request from F.H. Baldwin for the promotion of his brother, a lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Artillery.

“The above, written by a very good man, is submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln.”

Noted as a resident of Allentown, Pennsylvania in the accompanying National Archives records, Mr. Baldwin was undoubtedly a caller at the Executive Mansion, and was directed to write his request, hoping that President Lincoln would approve and advance it through the proper channels. His letter, accomplished in pencil, in full:

Aug. 12th 1864. To His Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the U.S. I desire the transfer or promotion of my brother, Lt. Henry M. Baldwin, Battery M, 5th Reg[imen]t U.S. Artillery, to any vacancy in the Regt. which you may decide it possible to place him, consistent with the good of the service. Very Resp[ectfull]y, F.H. Baldwin.”

There is no record of Lieutenant Baldwin’s promotion or transfer before he was severely wounded through the chest and left arm on October 19, 1864 – just two months later - at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He died on November 8, 1864 at Sheridan Hospital, near Winchester, Virginia.

The letter is in excellent condition, with creases from two vertical folds.                                                                                      

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6678

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Document Signed, 15” x 19”, as President, Washington, July 29, 1861, “Abraham Lincoln,” a partly printed appointment for “…Stephen Brooks…Surveyor of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Countersigned by the Secretary of the Treasury, “S.P. Chase.”

The document is in excellent overall condition, with light age toning and several minor paper breaks at the intersections of the usual folds. Both signatures are distinct and free from flaw in every respect.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6679

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Franked Envelope, 3” x 5 ¼”, as President, “A. Lincoln.” The envelope is also addressed by Lincoln, to “Rev[erend] Z.P. Wilds, 120 Prince Street, New York,” and has a June 21, 1862, Washington postmark.

The previous day, Lincoln met with a six-member delegation of Progressive Friends, composed of Thomas Garrett, Alice Eliza Hambleton, Oliver Johnson, Dinah Mendenhall, William Barnard, and Eliza Agnew. The group presented the President with a memorial, urging him to decree the emancipation of the slaves, the position adopted at the Friends’ annual meeting. It is quite worthy of note that Lincoln wrote Reverend Wilds, well known as a longtime missionary to the poor of New York City, the day following his meeting with this group of prominent leaders in the Abolition and Underground Railroad movements.

Set into an attractive, inlaid pedestal frame, the envelope bears general soiling and wear, along with minor paper loss along the right edge and above the somewhat smudged postmark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MADISON, DOLLEY P. (1768-1849)

# 6490

U.S. First Lady - 1809-17

Autograph Quotation Signed, on the front leaf of a 5” x 8” letter-sheet.

“A Toast. ‘The Rights of man the Gift of God; The powers of government the Grant of the people.’ D.P. Madison. Washington, June 6th 1842.”

The letter-sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with light soiling and wear. There are two horizontal folds and old glue staining in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MADISON, JAMES (1751-1836)

# 6926

Fourth U.S. President - 1809-17

Signature, “James Madison,” on a 1 ¼” x 3” slip of paper.

A sound example, with light soiling and wear.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McKINLEY, WILLIAM (1843-1901)

# 5977

Twenty-Fifth U.S. President - 1897-1901

Signed by President McKinley for the First Lady

Executive Mansion Card, 2 ¾” x 4 ¼”, signed by President William McKinley on behalf of the First Lady, “Ida S. McKinley.”

The card is undeniably rare, this being the first such example I have seen. Minor smudging of ink at the conclusion of the signature detracts very little from otherwise excellent condition.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McKINLEY, WILLIAM (1843-1901)

# 7047

Twenty-Fifth U.S. President - 1897-1901

Signed by President McKinley for the First Lady

Signatures, of the twenty-fifth President and the First Lady - both in the hand of President William McKinley - “William McKinley, Ida S. McKinley,” on a 5” x 7 ½” album page. Dating in an unidentified hand, “1/5/[18]99,” places the signing during McKinley’s first term in office.

Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and minor smearing of ink to several letters.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MONROE, JAMES (1758-1831)

# 6928

Fifth U.S. President - 1817-25

Signature, with a ten-word closing also in Monroe’s hand, “I am Sir with great respect Y[ou]r very ob[edien]t serv[an]t, Jas. Monroe,” on a 5” x 6 ½” portion of a letter as U.S. Secretary of State.

The sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with a few pinholes along the left of two vertical folds; there is a small hole in the margin at right, presumably from the opening of a wax seal.

OUT OF STOCK
 

POLK, JAMES K. (1795-1849)

# 6712

Eleventh U.S. President - 1845-49

Franked Envelope, 3 ¼” x 5 ¼”, “Free, J.K. Polk,” addressed in another hand to “Gen[eral] Thomas H. Bradley (Care of Gregg & Elliott), Philadelphia, Penn[sylvania],” also bearing a Washington City postmark and stamped “Free” postal designation.

There is nothing to indicate if the envelope is dated to Polk’s tenure in the U.S. Congress, 1825-39, or to his single term as U.S. President. The recipient, Thomas H. Bradley, a Williamson County, Tennessee native, served in the 1st Tennessee Volunteers during the Second Seminole War. Afterward, he established a large plantation on the Mississippi River in Arkansas, becoming one of the wealthiest planters in the area. In 1861, Bradley, a Unionist Democrat, was elected to the Arkansas Secession Convention, at which he was named brigadier general of Arkansas state troops.

Moderate soiling and wear is somewhat heavier at the edges.

OUT OF STOCK
 

POLK, JAMES K. (1795-1849)

# 6713

Eleventh U.S. President - 1845-49

Autograph Letter Signed, 8” x 10”. Just three weeks before his election to the presidency, Polk directs “Gen[era]l Bradley, Franklin, Tennesseein the posting of a letter to William G. Childress, possibly a member of the family of Polk’s wife, Sarah.

Columbia [Tennessee], Oct[ober] 16th 1844. My Dear Sir: I have written a letter to Wm. G. Childress – by this day’s mail, addressed to him at Franklin. I have to request that you will take it out of the office and send it to him to night, as I desire that he shall receive it early. I make this request because he may not call at the Post office for a day or two. You will oblige me by sending it out. In haste, Your friend, James K. Polk.”

The integral leaf is addressed by Polk to “Gen[era]l Thomas H. Bradley, Franklin, Williamson County, Tennessee,” and bears an October 16, Columbia, Tennessee postmark. A Williamson County native and veteran of the Second Seminole War, Bradley was at this time probably helping Polk, a fellow Tennessee Democrat, in his ultimately successful presidential campaign. In the years leading up to the Civil War, Bradley established a large plantation on the Mississippi River in Arkansas, becoming one of the wealthiest planters in the area. He was elected to the 1861 Arkansas Secession Convention, at which he was named brigadier general of Arkansas state troops.

Overall condition is excellent, with the usual folds and an old paper clip stain in the upper margin. There is a small area of paper loss in the lower margin of the address leaf, due to the opening of the wax seal.

OUT OF STOCK
 

POLK, SARAH CHILDRESS (1803-91)

# 6481

U.S. First Lady - 1845-49

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ¾”, “Mrs. James K. Polk,” dated in another hand on reverse, May 4, 1887.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with minor bleeding of ink at the “P” in the last name.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ROOSEVELT, ANNA ELEANOR (1884-1962)

# 6866

U.S. First Lady - 1933-1945

Typed Letter Signed, 6” x 7”, on Mrs. Roosevelt’s imprinted personal stationery.

New York, January 6, 1950. My dear Mr. Hallman: I have received your letter and I appreciate your writing. I am glad to know of the celebration that was held in Mexico. With many thanks and best wishes, Very sincerely yours, Eleanor Roosevelt.”

Condition is excellent, with a horizontal fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ROOSEVELT, FRANKLIN DELANO (1886-1945)

# 6035

32nd U.S. President - 1933-45

FDR Writes to a Young Polio Victim Who Hopes to go to Warm Springs

Typed Letter Signed, on embossed 8” x 10 ½” stationery as New York Governor, to “Miss Lenora Burge, 228 N. Orange Street, Rialto, California,” apparently a young polio victim, hoping to go to Warm Springs. Responding personally to her request for information, FDR refers the matter to the head physician at the well known rehabilitation center, founded by Roosevelt in 1927 for the treatment of others afflicted with polio.

Albany, June 8, 1931. Dear Lenora:- I have your letter of May 27th and am taking the liberty of sending it to Dr. Leroy W. Hubbard, the physician in charge at Warm Springs, Georgia, with the request that he send you full information about Warm Springs. Very sincerely yours, Franklin D. Roosevelt.”

Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 
48 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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