Historical Civil War Autographs
infobar.gif

 

Our Newsletter


MasterCard
americanexpress.gif         visa.gif

Vice Presidents, Supreme Court & Cabinet

Products
Showing All 45 Items.
  Show Paging 

BLAIR, MONTGOMERY (1813-83)

# 6940

U.S. Postmaster General - 1861-64; Brother of Francis P. Blair, Jr.; Mayor of St. Louis – 1842-43; Counsel for Dred Scott before the U.S. Supreme Court

War-Date Signed Envelope, 3 ¼” x 6”, free-franked as U.S. Postmaster General under President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, “M. Blair, P.M.G.” The envelope is also addressed by Blair, to “Col[onel] F.A. Dick, St. Louis, Mo.,” and is postmarked “Washington, D.C., May 8, 1863.”

The envelope is lightly toned, with minor wear and a few superficial tears at the edges, along with several small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CAMERON, SIMON (1799-1889)

# 6941

U.S. Secretary of War - 1861-62

As a contender for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1860, Cameron threw his support to Lincoln when promised a cabinet seat. His brief tenure as Secretary of War was so marked by corruption that he was forced to resign in 1862.

Signature, “Simon Cameron,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a small tear at the upper edge, well away from the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CAMPBELL, JOHN A. (1811-89)

# 7544

Confederate Assistant Secretary of War; U.S. Supreme Court Justice – 1853-61

War-Date Autograph Endorsement Signed

Civil War-Date Autograph Endorsement Signed, “A[djutant] G[eneral] For attention. By order of Sec[retar]y of War, J.A. Campbell, A[ssistant] S[ecretary] [of] W[ar], 23 June [18]63,” on a 1 ¾” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a Confederate document.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 6942

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war, and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

Inscribed Signature, as antebellum Governor of Ohio, “For Geo[rge] M. Fowler, Esq[uire]. I have the honor to be Very respectfully Yours & c., S.P. Chase, Columbus, Ap[ri]l 24, 1857,” on a 5” x 7” sheet of embossed stationery. A period engraved image, cut into an oval shape, has been affixed to the upper right corner.

The sheet has light soiling and wear, along with the expected folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 7045

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

War-Date Signature, with closing and title in another hand, “S.P. Chase,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a letter as U.S. Treasury Secretary, the position Chase held from March 4, 1861 through December 6, 1864; with the pencil notation, “1862” in the lower margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

COOLIDGE, CALVIN (1872-1933)

# 7658

Thirtieth U.S. President - 1923-29; U.S. Vice President - 1921-23; Governor of Massachusetts - 1919-21

As President, Just Nine Days after the Death of President Warren G. Harding

Typed Letter Signed, as President on 7” x 9” black-bordered White House stationery, due to the death of President Warren G. Harding in San Francisco just nine days earlier. Writing to George B. Lockwood, editor of The National Republican, first published in 1860 as the only Republican newspaper in Washington, D.C., the new president thanks Mr. Lockwood for his message – undoubtedly sympathy at the death of President Harding and well wishes for Coolidge - and hopes for a personal meeting.


Washington, August 11, 1923. Mr. George B. Lockwood, Editor, The National Republican, 425 Tenth Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. My dear Mr. Lockwood: I will only send a brief line to thank you for your kind message of the seventh. As we are to be together here in Washington, I shall be glad to have the opportunity of talking with you and thanking you personally. Very truly yours, Calvin Coolidge.”
The letter is very attractive and in excellent condition overall, with light, even toning and a horizontal fold at the center.

Price: $595.00
Quantity: 
 

COOLIDGE, CALVIN (1872-1933)

# 7659

Thirtieth U.S. President - 1923-29; U.S. Vice President – 1921-23; Governor of Massachusetts – 1919-21

Document Signed, 3” x 8 ½”, Northampton, Massachusetts, March 29, 1929, “Calvin Coolidge,” a partly printed check, also accomplished by Coolidge less than a month after leaving office as U.S. President, drawn on The Hampshire County Trust Co. and made payable to one Mary Ahearn for thirty dollars.

The check is in very good condition, with minor smudging of ink to several letters, a small tear in the upper margin, and a few light vertical folds. The hole-punch cancellation at center affects an insignificant part of the beginning of Coolidge’s signature.

Price: $495.00
Quantity: 
 

COOLIDGE, CALVIN (1872-1933)

# 7657

Thirtieth U.S. President - 1923-29; U.S. Vice President – 1921-23; Governor of Massachusetts – 1919-21

Vice President Coolidge Thanks a Jounalist from The Nation

Typed Letter Signed, 7” x 9”. Writing on imprinted official stationery, U.S. Vice President Coolidge thanks Marian Tyler, a journalist with The Nation, a liberal weekly magazine first published in 1865, for her letter.


“THE VICE-PRESIDENT’S CHAMBER, WASHINGTON, February 2, 1922. Miss Marian Tyler, The Nation, 20 Vesey Street, New York, N.Y. My dear Miss Tyler: Please accept my thanks for your letter and enclosure. It is always interesting to see the discussion that goes on in the public press. Very sincerely yours, Calvin Coolidge.
The letter is lightly toned and soiled, with a horizontal fold at the center.

Price: $425.00
Quantity: 
 

COOLIDGE, CALVIN (1872-1933)

# 7656

Thirtieth U.S. President - 1923-29; U.S. Vice President – 1921-23; Governor of Massachusetts – 1919-21

The Vice President-Elect Thanks a Supporter – Just Two Days after the 1920 Election

Typed Letter Signed, 7 ¼” x 9 ½”, on imprinted stationery as Massachusetts Governor.  During the second year of his short tenure as governor - just two days after election to U.S. vice president on the Warren G. Harding ticket - Coolidge thanks “Mr. Ernest M. Hortmann, Boston, Mass.,” for a letter.


“EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, STATE HOUSE, BOSTON. 4th November, 1920…My dear Mr. Hortmann: It was exceedingly thoughtful of you to send me such a gracious message. I want to thank you for your kind wishes which I assure you I reciprocate. Cordially yours, Calvin Coolidge.
The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds and a pinhole along the bottom edge.

Price: $350.00
Quantity: 
 

DENNISON, WILLIAM (1815-82)

# 6943

U.S. Postmaster General – 1864-66; Governor of Ohio – 1860-62

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ¼”, “W. Dennison,” with the notation “Post Master General, Feb. 10th 1866in another hand beneath.

Lightly and evenly toned, with mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6860

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Signed Card, 2” x 4 ¼”, “Edward Everett.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a few stains, and there is glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6995

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Autograph Letter Signed, 6 ½” x 8”, to “Mrs. J.L. Payson.” From his home in Boston, Everett amusingly responds to a request for autographs, presumably those of Rufus Choate, Thomas Hart Benton, and Washington Irving – no longer present with this letter.

“Summer Street, 23 Nov[ember] 1854. Dear Mrs. Payson, After my former note was written, it occurred to me to send you the autographs of Mr. Choate, and Col. Benton, in addition to that of Mr. Irving; a group certainly of which the members have nothing in common, but that they are all celebrities. With the greatest Regard, Sincerely Yours, Edward Everett.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the expected folds. There are two tears, with no loss of paper, in the lower left corner, along with damp-staining along the right margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FESSENDEN, WILLIAM P. (1806-69)

# 6944

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1864-65; U.S. Senator – Maine – 1854-69

Signature, as U.S. Senator, “W.P. Fessenden, U[nited] S[tates] S[enate],” on a 1” x 3” slip paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FILLMORE, MILLARD (1800-74)

# 7653

Thirteenth U.S. President - 1850-53; U.S. Vice President 1849-50

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 4 ¼” x 5”, responding to an autograph request from “J.P. Story, Esq[uire], St. Louis.”

“Buffalo, [New York], March 25, 1865. Sir, I cheerfully comply with your request for my autograph, and am, Truly yours, Millard Fillmore.”

The letter is lightly toned, with two horizontal folds and old glue staining on the reverse.

Price: $595.00
Quantity: 
 

FILLMORE, MILLARD (1800-74)

# 7652

Thirteenth U.S. President - 1850-53; U.S. Vice President 1849-50

Document Signed, 8 ¼” x 10 ¼”, as U.S. President, a partly printed “affix the seal” document.


“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to the remission of the remaining portion of the term of imprisonment, imposed upon Jacob Rowles, convicted of petit larceny; dated this day, and signed by me; and for so doing this shall be his warrant. Millard Fillmore, Washington, October 3, 1850.”
The document bears light soiling and wear, and there are a few edge chips and tears, along with weakness and minor paper separation at the edges of two horizontal folds.

Price: $850.00
Quantity: 
 

FOOTE, ANDREW H. (1806-1863)

# 6852

Union Rear Admiral

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)  U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69


As commodore in the U.S. Navy, Foote provided naval support in the Federal operations against Forts Henry and Donelson and in the bombardment of Island #10. Promoted to rear admiral for those actions, he died shortly after being transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 1863.

As the Country Prepares for War - Just a Month Before the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter - a Union Sailor is Detached to Await Orders

Endorsement Signed, “Forwarded by A.H. Foote…March 11/[18]61,” on the reverse of the attached leaf of a Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, by Navy Secretary Gideon Welles. In an action undoubtedly replicated throughout the military, emblematic of the nation’s preparation for the Civil War that would break out just a month later, Welles orders “3rd Ass[istan]t Engineer Oscar H. Lackey, U.S. Navy, New York,” detached from his prior assignment aboard the Crusader, to await further orders:

“Navy Department, 9 March 1861. Sir, You are hereby detached from the Crusader and you will regard yourself as Waiting Orders. I am, respectfully, Your Obed[ien]t Serv[an]t, Gideon Welles...”

The letter-sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with an old clip hole in the upper margin. The integral leaf signed by Foote bears heavier soiling and wear, and contains an extremely detailed Navy Department watermark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMILTON, ALEXANDER (1757-1804)

# 6513

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1789-95; Revolutionary War Captain & Aide-de-Camp to General Washington; Killed in a Duel with Aaron Burr on July 11, 1804

Letter Signed, 1 ½ pages, front and reverse of a 7 ¾” x 9” sheet, a manuscript U.S. Treasury Department circular letter. At the authorization and direction of the House of Representatives during the term of the Second U.S. Congress, Treasury Secretary Hamilton seeks information relating to reported shortfalls in the receipt of funds by various customs officers for the year 1790.

“Treasury Department, April 14, 1791. Sir, The House of Representatives having been pleased to direct me to examine and report upon the endorsements of the several Officers of the Customs. I find it necessary to enable me to form a satisfactory judgment upon the subject that I be furnished with an accurate account, as much as possible in detail of all the monies received in the four quarters of the year 1790 by every Officer of the Customs who conceives himself to be insufficiently compensated. You will therefore if you think it proper to have your case taken into consideration transmit me such an account, and you will exhibit in detail likewise in the same paper the expenses of every kind which you have actually paid during the same year. The sooner this information is received, the more early I can enter upon the formation of a report. Should you think proper to make any observations they will be acceptable. For the greater clearness I wish the letter inclosing the above account to be confined to the subject. I am Sir Your Obed[ien]t Servant, A. Hamilton.

The letter bears light, even toning and general wear, and there are a few edge chips and tears, all well away from the text. One of several paper breaks along the usual folds has been repaired with a small strip of paper on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMILTON, PAUL (1762-1816)

# 6973

U.S. Secretary of the Navy – 1809-13; Governor of South Carolina – 1804-06

Repairs for the USS Enterprise - After Service Against Barbary Pirates in the Mediterranean

Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, to “John Trippe, esquire, L[ieutenan]t Comm[ande]r, the Sch[ooner] Enterprise, N[ew] York.” As U.S. Navy Secretary, Hamilton conveys information relating to the repair of the Enterprise, and of her conversion to a brig. The ship was commissioned into the Navy fleet in 1799, quickly deployed in the Quasi-War with France, and soon was put into active service against pirates on the Barbary Coast. The vessel continued to patrol the Mediterranean for the next several years, returning to the United States for repair in late 1809, the preliminary details of her refurbishing being discussed in this letter.


“Navy Department, 8 Dec[ember] 1809. Sir, I have received your letter of the 2nd ins[tant] & congratulate you on your safe arrival in the United States. When the repairs of the Enterprise shall be authorized, you may convert her into a brig – but I can not at this moment determine whether to authorize her repair immediately or not – nor can I determine, until you make a particular report on the subject, stating the repairs necessary, & the expense of making them. I am respectfully Y[ou]r serv[an]t, Paul Hamilton.
Repair of the Enterprise was accomplished by early 1811, and she was refitted as a brig the following year. She saw active service against the British Navy during the War of 1812, most notably in the fierce naval battle which resulted in her capture of the British Brig Boxer, the commanders of both ships being killed in the engagement.

Born in Maryland in 1785, Lieutenant Commander John Trippe had become a midshipman in 1799, serving during the Quasi-War and in the Mediterranean, although on other vessels. He commanded the Enterprise during the year before her return to New York, but was assigned to other ships during her time in port. Lieutenant Commander Trippe died during the summer of 1810, although records differ as to whether he was aboard the Enterprise or the Vixen at the time of his death.

The letter is lightly toned, with the expected folds and light creases; several edge tears along the right edge, none affecting the text of the letter, have been repaired on the reverse, and there is a one-half inch strip of heavier paper affixed to the reverse along the left edge, presumably from past binding.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 6945

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signature, “H. Hamlin, Maine,” on a 2 ¾” x 4 ¾” portion of a lightly toned album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 7001

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¼”, with a full signature, Hannibal Hamlin, Bangor, Ap[ri]l 18, 1891,” from Hamlin’s home in Maine, less than three months before his death.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6880

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4 ¼”, “John Hay.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6946

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois, and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4”, “John Hay.”

Pristine, both front and reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6714

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, on the first and third leaves of a 5 ¼” x 8” letter-sheet. Addressing former Union General Frederick Tracy Dent, brother-in-law and secretary of President Ulysses S. Grant, Hay seeks the help of the President in securing his brother’s advancement in the military.

New York, August 31 [no year]. My Dear General Dent, Enclosed you will find the note to the President which you suggested I should write. My brother Lieutenant Leonard Hay is Adjutant of the 9th Infantry. He likes the service and desires to remain in it. I know him to be a very efficient and valuable officer and if you can do anything to promote his wishes, I am sure it will be to the advantage of the service, and will lay me under great personal obligations. I am very faithfully yours, John Hay. P.S. My address will be for the present ‘Republican Office, Chicago’ where I am always at your disposition.”

Beneath Hay’s closing and signature, General Dent has written and initialed a biographical notation of Hay, in pencil, “Private Sec[retary] of President Lincoln and author of Jim Beldsoe & little breeches. F.T.D.”

The letter-sheet bears the usual light toning, and there is weakness and clean separation, with no loss of paper, at the edges of two horizontal folds. The text of the letter is unaffected by a three-quarter inch area of paper loss in the upper margin of the second page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL, JR. (1841-1935)

# 6786

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice– 1902-32; Civil War Union Captain – 20th Massachusetts Infantry

Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 6 ½”, to “Mrs. Carl C. Wheaton.” As U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, Holmes cordially complies with an autograph request, signing in full at the conclusion.

Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, September 5, 1930. My dear Mrs. Wheaton, Presence here will prevent my accepting your kind offer to show me your autograph book, but it gives me pleasure to comply with your slight request that I add to it and join so distinguished a company. Very Truly Yours, Oliver Wendell Holmes.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few unobtrusive stains and a horizontal fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JOHNSON, LYNDON BAINES (1908-1973)

# 7663

Thirty-Sixth U.S. President 1963-69; U.S. Vice President – 1961-63

Signed Program, 4” x 6”, as President, “Lyndon B. Johnson.” The program is for a White House event in honor of the President of the Philippines on October 5, 1964, featuring The Harkness Ballet.

The heavy paper is lightly and evenly toned, with superficial wear and soiling.

Price: $495.00
Quantity: 
 

LINCOLN, ROBERT TODD (1843-1926)

# 6707

U.S. Secretary of War - 1881-85; Son of Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln

Signed Card, 1 ¾” x 3”, “Robert T. Lincoln.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting traces on the reverse. It is accompanied by an illustrated trade card from an Amsterdam, New York grocer.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ROBERT TODD (1843-1926)

# 6778

American Statesman; U.S. Secretary of War - 1881-85

Lincoln was the oldest and only surviving son of Abraham and Mary Lincoln.

Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a 4” x 6” imprinted War Department letter-sheet, to a Mrs. Frelinghuysen, quite possibly a relative of Secretary of State Frederick T. Frelinghuysen. As Secretary of War during the presidency of Chester Arthur, Lincoln sends information relating to a request that a West Point cadet be precluded from attending chapel at the Military Academy. The request was made by the young man’s mother, and Lincoln refers to the rule empowering the superintendent, General Wesley Merritt, a Union Major General during the Civil War, to make the decision.

“Oct[ober] 31, 1882. My dear Mrs. Frelinghuysen, Referring to our conversation on the case about a Cadet whose mother does not wish him to attend Chapel at the Military Academy, I send you a copy of the rule on the subject. It seems to give the Superintendent ample power to settle such matters & I have no doubt that Gen[eral] Merritt would accede to an application or fin[d] satisfactory reasons for not doing so. Very sincerely yours, Robert T. Lincoln.”

The letter-sheet has the usual folds, with heavier soiling and wear to the first page of the letter.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCULLOCH, HUGH (1808-95)

# 6949

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1865-69 & 1884-85

Signature, “Hugh McCulloch,” on a 2 ¼” x 4” slip of paper. A small image is affixed to the lower left corner; the signature is, in turn, mounted to a 5 ½” x 8 ½” album page, with the notation, “Secretary of the Treasury 1867,” in another hand above.

The signed slip is lightly and evenly toned. The larger album page has several chips and binding holes along the left edge, along with two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MILLER, SAMUEL F. (1816-90)

# 7555

U.S. Supreme Court Justice – 1862-90; Appointed by Abraham Lincoln

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with Supreme Court title, “Sam. F. Miller, Justice Sup[reme] Court United States.”

The card is in excellent condition, with minor brushing of ink.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PIERREPONT, EDWARDS (1817-92)

# 7017

U.S. Attorney General – 1875-76; Prosecutor in the Lincoln Assassination Conspiracy Trial of John Surratt

Letter Signed, on imprinted 8” x 10” stationery as U.S. Attorney General, accepting the resignation of Lemuel D. Evans as U.S. Marshal for the Eastern Judicial District of Texas.

Washington, Jan[uar]y 22, 1876. L.D. Evans Esq., U.S. Marshal for E[aster]n Tex[as], Washington, D.C. Sir, I have received yours of the 29th instant, laying before me your resignation of the Marshalship of the Eastern District of Texas, to take effect on the 17th day of February, 1876, which resignation I hereby accept. Very respectfully, Edw. Pierrepont, Attorney General.”

Born in Tennessee, Lemuel Evans moved to Texas early in life, serving as a member of the state convention that annexed the State of Texas to the Union in 1845. He subsequently served a term in the U.S. Congress, as a member of the Reconstruction Convention of 1868, and as justice on the Texas Supreme Court. Evans died on July 1, 1877 in Washington, D.C.

The letter is pleasantly toned, with the expected horizontal folds and two spindle holes in the upper margin. There is a small tear, with no loss of paper, in the lower left corner, along with minor bleeding of ink to several letters in Pierrepont’s signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SMITH, CALEB BLOOD (1808-1864)

# 6952

U.S. Interior Secretary – 1861-63

Signature, “Caleb B. Smith,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPEED, JAMES (1812-87)

# 6953

U.S. Attorney General – 1864-66

Signed Card, 1 ¼” x 3 ¼”, “James Speed.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with minor bleeding of ink at the conclusion of the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPINNER, FRANCIS E. (1802-90)

# 6954

U.S. Treasurer - 1861-75; U.S. Congressman – New York – 1855-61

Signature, as U.S. Congressman, “F.E. Spinner, M[ember] C[ongress],” on a 1” x 3” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 6955

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

Signature, with the closing in another hand, Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ½” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 7042

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

President Lincoln Appoints Henry Larcom Abott a Brevet Brigadier General

War-Date Document Signed, 8” x 10,” as Secretary of War, Washington, December 2, 1864, “E.M. Stanton,” a partly printed War Department letter informing 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Colonel Henry Larcom Abbott that he has been appointed to the rank of brevet brigadier general by President Lincoln, “…for gallant and distinguished services in the operations before Richmond and especially in the lines before Petersburg,” to rank from August 1, 1864.

A manuscript notation in the lower margin directs this letter through Army of the Potomac Commanding General George G. Meade.

Condition is very good, with light toning and the usual horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STEPHENS, ALEXANDER H. (1812-83)

# 6476

Confederate Vice President - Georgia

Despite his unionist stance as congressman from Georgia, Stephens followed his native state to the Confederacy, becoming a representative in the Provisional Congress, a position he retained even after assuming the Vice Presidency. After the war, he returned to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1873 through 1882. 

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, three pages on a folded 4” x 6 ¼” letter-sheet, as Confederate Vice President, recommending a young engineer, Assistant Master of the Confederate Armory at Richmond, Virginia, Amassa Ring, formerly in the employ of the armory at Harpers Ferry, to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. 

“Richmond, Va., 29 March 1862, His Excellency Joseph E. Brown, Milledgeville, Ga. Dear Sir, Mr. Amassa W. Ring, a engineer who is now 1st Ass[istan]t Master of the Confederate States Armory in this city wishes to get employment in the manufacture of arms in our state. I consider him well qualified – superior quality to Mr. Jones who I understand is now in the Service of the State. Mr. Ring is quite a mechanical genius – sober, young [?] comprehensive and combining in business some of the rarest and best qualities of a artful & practical man I ever saw combined in any one character. He was in the U.S. Coast Survey up to the secession of Ga. He after that went to Harpers Ferry & from there to this city. I feel assured if you have any business for such a man a better or fitter one cannot be got in the Confederacy if in the Government. Yours truly, Alexander H. Stephens.”

Just two weeks earlier, Union General George B. McClellan had begun floating the enormous Federal Army of the Potomac down the Chesapeake to the tip of the York-James Peninsula. Anticipating the imminent campaign to take Richmond, along with the possible evacuation of the city and abandonment of its military stores and production facilities, Stephens predictably takes a position favorable to his native state by suggesting Ring to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. Despite McClellan’s failure to take Richmond in the spring of 1862, much of the South’s war industry was soon shifted to less threatened areas, most notably to the Confederate States Armory at Macon, Georgia.

Lightly and evenly toned, with the usual folds; brushing, spotting and offsetting of ink throughout.

OUT OF STOCK
 

TAFT, WILLIAM HOWARD (1857-1930)

# 7498

27th U.S. President - 1909-13; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice – 1921-30; U.S. Secretary of War - 1904-08

Document Signed, 19” x 23”, as President just three days before the end of his term, Washington, D.C., March 1, 1913, “W.H. Taft,” a partly printed appointment for “Charles Campbell, Jr., of Virginia…Secretary of the Legation and Consul General of the United States to Roumania, Servia and Bulgaria."  The document is countersigned by Secretary of State Philander C. Knox, and is accompanied by several items related to Campbell’s academic and professional life: four personal 1 ½” x 3” calling cards, imprinted “Mr. Charles Campbell, Jr., Third Secretary American Embassy,”; an award for scholastic achievement from The Raven Society, University of Virginia, dated September 30, 1907; and an appointment as Knight of the Order of the Black Star, issued in Paris on September 24, 1919.

The diplomatic appointment is lightly and evenly toned, with pinholes at the center intersections of the usual folds, and a few small stains; Campbell’s personal calling cards are in excellent condition; and the French document has numerous creases, edges chips, and tears.

Price: $395.00
Quantity: 
 

TRUMAN, HARRY S. (1884-1972)

# 7661

Thirty-Third U.S. President - 1945-53; U.S. Vice President - 1945

President Truman Thanks Missouri Constituents for a Christmas Ham

Typed Letter Signed, 7” x 8 ¾”, as President on White House stationery, thanking “Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Holt, 229 Main Street, Boonville, Missouri,” for a Christmas ham.


“Washington, January 3, 1949. Dear Mr. and Mrs. Holt: You certainly were generous to send us that ‘blue ribbon’ ham which I am sure you must have prized very highly. We are using it sparingly so that we may enjoy it for a long time. I cannot tell you how much the family and I appreciate your though of us and we unite in extending all good wishes to you. Very sincerely yours, Harry S. Truman.
In excellent condition, the letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the usual horizontal fold at the center, and there are a few minor glue stains on the blank reverse of the integral leaf.

Price: $450.00
Quantity: 
 

TRUMAN, HARRY S. (1884-1972)

# 7662

Thirty-Third U.S. President - 1945-53; U.S. Vice President - 1945

President Truman Thanks Major General W.B. Persons for Thirty Years of Military Service

Typed Letter Signed, 7” x 8 ¾”, as President on White House stationery, to “Major General W.B. Persons, Pentagon Building, Washington, D.C.”


“Washington, June 29, 1949. Dear General Persons: I understand you are on the eve of retirement after thirty years service. I just want to expressw to you my hope that you will have a long and happy life anda useful career after your retirement. I was well acquainted with your work in the Congress while I was in the Senate and you made a great contribution to the war effort. Best of luck to you. Sincerely yours, Harry S. Truman.
After entering the U.S. Army Coast Artillery in 1917, Wilton “Jerry” Persons served in the American Expeditionary Force in World War I and in Europe during World War II, rising to the rank of Major General in 1944. He served as legislative liaison for the Defense Department from 1948 until his retirement in 1949 and as special assistant to General Dwight Eisenhower, 1951-52. Persons campaigned for Eisenhower in the 1952 presidential election and served as the President’s special assistant from 1953 through 1958, then as chief of staff from 1958 through 1961.

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains and the usual horizontal fold at the center.

Price: $750.00
Quantity: 
 

VAN BUREN, MARTIN (1782-1862)

# 7650

Eighth U.S. President - 1837-41; U.S. Vice President – 1833-37; U.S. Secretary of State – 1829-31; Governor of New York - 1829

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 8”, two pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded letter-sheet. From his home in Kinderhook, New York, Van Buren sends details of an upcoming trip to an unnamed friend.


“Lindenwald, October 17th [18]61. Many thanks to you my dear Judge for your affectionate & obliging letter. I shall wait till after the election. I hope to be ready to leave home on the day after. I spend the night with you & I hope have the pleasure of your company to Clifton. I will drop you a line in advance. Present me most kindly to Mrs. Page, Mrs. Mumford & the young ladies, & believe me truly yours, M. Van Buren.” 
In excellent condition overall, the letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few superficial stains and three horizontal folds.

Price: $895.00
Quantity: 
 

WALTON, GEORGE (1749-1804)

# 7665

Signer of the Declaration of Independence; U.S. Senator – Georgia – 1795-96; Governor of Georgia – 1789-90; Chief Justice of Georgia 1783-89

Document Signed, 8” x 12 ½”, Chatham County, Georgia, December 14, 1785, “Geo. Walton,” as Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court, a manuscript legal document regarding the payment of a debt.

The document is evenly toned, with several stains and a few insignificant edge chips and tears. One word of text is affected by a small area of paper loss near the right edge, along the uppermost of three horizontal folds, another of which has been repaired on the reverse.

Price: $725.00
Quantity: 
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 6958

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains and a slightly irregular upper edge.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 7051

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ¾” portion of an appointment document.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a vertical crease through the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WILSON, JAMES (1742-98)

# 7666

Signer of the Declaration of Independence; Signer of the U.S. Constitution; Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court – 1789-98; Member of the Continental Congress – 1776-77; Revolutionary War Brigadier General in the Pennsylvania State Militia

Signature, “James Wilson,” on an undated 4 ¾” x 8 ½” portion of a manuscript legal document.

The paper is lightly and evenly toned, with inconsequential paper loss at the right edges of two horizontal folds. There is a small hole at mid right, where a paper seal was once attached.  

OUT OF STOCK
 

WILSON, JAMES (1835-1920)

# 7272

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture – 1897-1913; U.S. Congressman – Iowa – 1873-77

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from Iowa, “James Wilson, Iowa,” on a lightly toned 2” x 6” portion of an album page.

Price: $25.00
Quantity: 
 
Showing All 45 Items.
  Show Paging