Historical Civil War Autographs
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War-Date Autographs, Documents & Letters

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50 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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HAMMOND, JOHN (1827-89)

# 7236

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 5th New York Cavalry; U.S. Congressman – New York - 1879-83

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed – as Major of the Fifth New York Cavalry

War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a lightly toned 2 ¼” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 5th N.Y. Cavalry, n[ea]r Hartwood Ch[urch, Va., Sept[ember] 6, 1863. Approved recommended and respectfully forwarded. J. Hammond, Major Com[man]d[in]g.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMPTON, WADE (1818-1902)

# 7515

Confederate Lieutenant General– South Carolina; Governor of South Carolina – 1876-79; Democratic U.S. Senator – South Carolina – 1879-91

Hampton served with distinction from First Manassas through the surrender of Joseph Johnston in North Carolina, becoming, along with Nathan Bedford Forrest and Richard Taylor, one of only three civilians to attain the rank of lieutenant general.

War-Date Signature & Rank

Civil War-Date Signature, with rank, “Wade Hampton, Brig. Genl.” on a ½” x 3 ½” slip of paper, removed from a Confederate requisition document.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HOPKINS, STEPHEN (1707-85)

# 7664

Signer of the Declaration of Independence – Rhode Island; Delegate to the Continental Congress – Rhode Island – 1774-76; Governor of the Colony of Rhode Island – 1755-57, 1758-62, 1763-65 & 1767-68

French and Indian War-Date Pay Order

War-Date Document Signed, 4 ¼” x 6 ¼”, a manuscript pay order “To Thos. Richardson, Esq[uire], Gen[eral] Treasurer,”  The document is co-signed by Hopkins’ fellow committeemen, assigned the task of preparing for war with France, later known as The French and Indian War, 1754-63.


“Newport, [Rhode Island], May 12, 1755. Sir, Pay Mr. George Lanton Sixty nine pounds, six shillings & six pence (old Tenor) in full of his al[lotmen]t for the French mens boat & charge the same to the Colony. Step. Hopkins.
The document is lightly and evenly toned, with clean paper separation along the center horizontal fold. The text of the document is unaffected by minor paper loss at the corners.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JACKSON, THOMAS J. "STONEWALL” (1824-63)

# 7035

Confederate Lieutenant General – Virginia

After entering Confederate service as Colonel of Virginia Militia, Jackson earned the sobriquet "Stonewall" at First Manassas, serving brilliantly from the Valley Campaign through Second Manassas, Sharpsburg, and Chancellorsville. He was accidentally wounded by his own troops while returning from a personal reconnaissance of the Union position at Chancellorsville, and died on May 10, 1863.

War-Date Document Signed, 4 ½” x 6 ½”, May 1, 1861, as early-war colonel of Virginia Volunteers, “T.J. Jackson, Col. Va. Vols.,” a partly printed field-press requisition for pens and pen holders, accomplished in another hand.

There is slightly heavier toning along the right edge, with two horizontal folds, and the document is closely trimmed at the bottom, affecting several letters in Jackson’s rank.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewLEE, FITZHUGH (1835-1905)

# 7518

Confederate Major General - Virginia

A nephew of Robert E. Lee, Fitzhugh Lee directed cavalry during Jeb Stuart’s ride around McClellan, and fought from Antietam and Gettysburg through Appomattox. He served as post-war Governor of Virginia.

War-Date Endorsement Signed

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

“Approved, Fitz Lee, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Com[man]d[in]g.”

Excellent overall, with minor show-through of old glue staining from the reverse.

Price: $650.00
Quantity: 
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6379

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

A Request for a Lieutenant’s Promotion – Just Two Months Before He was Mortally Wounded at Cedar Creek

Civil War-Date Autograph Note Signed, as President on a 5” x 8” sheet of Executive Mansion stationery, beneath a request from F.H. Baldwin for the promotion of his brother, a lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Artillery.

“The above, written by a very good man, is submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln.”

Noted as a resident of Allentown, Pennsylvania in the accompanying National Archives records, Mr. Baldwin was undoubtedly a caller at the Executive Mansion, and was directed to write his request, hoping that President Lincoln would approve and advance it through the proper channels. His letter, accomplished in pencil, in full:

Aug. 12th 1864. To His Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the U.S. I desire the transfer or promotion of my brother, Lt. Henry M. Baldwin, Battery M, 5th Reg[imen]t U.S. Artillery, to any vacancy in the Regt. which you may decide it possible to place him, consistent with the good of the service. Very Resp[ectfull]y, F.H. Baldwin.”

There is no record of Lieutenant Baldwin’s promotion or transfer before he was severely wounded through the chest and left arm on October 19, 1864 – just two months later - at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He died on November 8, 1864 at Sheridan Hospital, near Winchester, Virginia.

The letter is in excellent condition, with creases from two vertical folds.                                                                                      

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6678

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Document Signed, 15” x 19”, as President, Washington, July 29, 1861, “Abraham Lincoln,” a partly printed appointment for “…Stephen Brooks…Surveyor of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Countersigned by the Secretary of the Treasury, “S.P. Chase.”

The document is in excellent overall condition, with light age toning and several minor paper breaks at the intersections of the usual folds. Both signatures are distinct and free from flaw in every respect.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6679

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Franked Envelope, 3” x 5 ¼”, as President, “A. Lincoln.” The envelope is also addressed by Lincoln, to “Rev[erend] Z.P. Wilds, 120 Prince Street, New York,” and has a June 21, 1862, Washington postmark.

The previous day, Lincoln met with a six-member delegation of Progressive Friends, composed of Thomas Garrett, Alice Eliza Hambleton, Oliver Johnson, Dinah Mendenhall, William Barnard, and Eliza Agnew. The group presented the President with a memorial, urging him to decree the emancipation of the slaves, the position adopted at the Friends’ annual meeting. It is quite worthy of note that Lincoln wrote Reverend Wilds, well known as a longtime missionary to the poor of New York City, the day following his meeting with this group of prominent leaders in the Abolition and Underground Railroad movements.

Set into an attractive, inlaid pedestal frame, the envelope bears general soiling and wear, along with minor paper loss along the right edge and above the somewhat smudged postmark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewLONGSTREET, JAMES (1821-1904)

# 7517

Confederate Lieutenant General – South Carolina

Longstreet saw action from First Manassas through Appomattox, becoming Lee’s senior lieutenant general in the Army of Northern Virginia. He held post-war positions in the Grant, McKinley, and Roosevelt administrations.

War-Date Endorsement Signed

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

Respectfully forwarded, J. Longstreet, L[ieutenan]t Gen[era]l.”

While post-war manuscripts by Longstreet are readily available, war-date examples are seldom encountered. This endorsement, distinctly signed by Longstreet with his right hand, can be dated to the war-time period before the Battle of the Wilderness, May 5 & 6, 1864, where a severe wound forced Longstreet to use his left hand for writing for many years afterward.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MAURY, DABNEY H. (1822-1900)

# 7527

Confederate Major General – Virginia

After serving with distinction in the U.S. Army, Maury was dismissed on June 25, 1861 for “expressing treasonable designs.” He subsequently served on Van Dorn’s staff and fought at Pea Ridge, Iuka, Corinth, Vicksburg, and Mobile, defending that city until the end of the war.

War-Date Signature

Civil War-Date Signature, “Dabney H. Maury, Major Genl. Com[man]d[in]g,on a 1 ¼” x 4 ¾” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

There is show-through from several stains on the reverse.

Price: $325.00
Quantity: 
 

McCLELLAN, MARY ELLEN MARCY (1836-1915)

# 5797

Wife of Union General George B. McClellan; Daughter of Union General Randolph B. Marcy

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on separate sheets of a folded 3 ½” x 5 ½” embossed personal letter-sheet, responding to a request for her husband’s autograph. 

“Mr. Renshaw – I regret that I have no note of Genl. McClellan’s that I can give away – and when asked for his autographs am obliged to send merely his signature. If this will afford you any gratification I am very happy to enclose it to you. Yours & c, M.E. McClellan. New York City, May 19th/[18]62.”

At the time, General McClellan had completed his tentative advance up the York-James Peninsula to threaten Richmond, and he had written to his wife frequently during the month-long campaign. The letters which Mrs. McClellan was unwilling to part with would have undoubtedly contained significant insight into both the movement of the Army of the Potomac and her husband’s frustration at the continuous urging of President Lincoln for more aggressive action against the outnumbered Confederate defenders.

Lightly and evenly toned, with several light folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McPHERSON, JAMES B. (1828-64)

# 6887

Union Major General - Ohio

An 1853 graduate of West Point, McPherson entered the war as first lieutenant of engineers, seeing action at Forts Henry & Donelson, Shiloh, and Corinth. As major general of volunteers, he commanded the 17th Corps through the Vicksburg Campaign, winning the praise of both Grant and Sherman. McPherson was killed-in-action on July 22,1864, during Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “Jas. B. McPherson, Maj. Genl.” on a 1 ½” x 3 ¾” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NIMITZ, CHESTER W. (1885-1966)

# 7155

U.S. Navy Admiral; Commander-in-Chief of the United States Pacific Fleet – 1941-45

During the Final Months of World War II, Nimitz Expresses Support for a Rehabilitation Center for Wounded Veterans on Staten Island – Modeled after FDR’s Facility at Warm Springs, Georgia

War-Date Typed Letter Signed, 8” x 10 ½”, on imprinted stationery as Commander of the United States Pacific Fleet during World War II, to “Irving Geist, 1372 Broadway, New York, New York.”

Writing from his Advance Headquarters on Guam during the final months of the war, Nimitz expresses support for “constructing swimming pools, similar to those at Warm Springs,” the facility founded by Franklin Roosevelt in Georgia to treat victims of polio, for the rehabilitation of wounded World War II veterans at the Halloran General Hospital on Staten Island. He further declines to submit a statement and a photograph for publication, due to the demands of the war. A well-known New York philanthropist, Geist had committed to the task of raising the estimated $150,000 to finance the project at Halloran General Hospital the previous year.


1 June 1945.

Dear Mr Geist:

This will acknowledge your letter of 3 May 1945, which has just reached my Advance Headquarters at Guam.  You may be certain that measures undertaken for the benefit of our returning wounded veterans have my most sympathetic approval. I congratulate you and the men associated with you on your project for constructing swimming pools, similar to those at Warm Springs, for the Halloran General Hospital and I hope and believe that they will prove beneficial to the men for whose use they are intended.

The increasing momentum of the Pacific war has made so many demands upon my time that I have been obliged to adopt a policy of not making statements for publication in connection with endeavors which are not of national scope, however worthwhile such endeavors may be. Therefore I must regretfully decline your request that my photograph and a statement from me be sent for publication in the Dedication Journal.

I deeply appreciate the patriotic motive which prompted you in making the request and offer you my good wishes for the success of your endeavor.

Sincerely yours,

C.W. Nimitz,

C.W. NIMITZ
Fleet Admiral, U.S. Navy.”


Originally planned in 1938 as a treatment center for children with developmental disabilities, Willowbrook State School was renamed Halloran General Hospital after the late Colonel Paul Stacey Halloran, and served as a treatment center for returning wounded veterans from 1942 through 1947.

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds, and there are two pinholes and a light paper clip indentation in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PICKENS, FRANCIS W. (1805-69)

# 6855

Confederate Governor of South Carolina – 1860-62; U.S. Congressman – South Carolina – 1834-43

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, on imprinted stationery as Confederate Governor of South Carolina. Shortly after the outbreak of war, Pickens instructs the commissary general in the payment and distribution of rations for troops in the new South Carolina regiments.

4 June 1861To Commissary Gen[era]l Walker. Sir, I rec[eive]d yours of this inst[ant]. Capt[ain] Elliot’s company appear to have rec[eive]d rations at 40 c[en]ts – and the service was for twenty four days – and the highest Army ration is 30 c[en]ts. The $488.10 is the highest one paid. This of course includes beef & vegetables, & the bill for $151.75 cannot be allowed. As to temporary supplies to Gen[era]l Garlington, Col[one]l Rion, and Col[one]l Blandings command, you might furnish for a day or so. Please see that the supplies left by Cash’s reg[imen]t at Florence are taken care of & held or brought to the city, & so of Burns & Jenkins & all the other reg[imen]ts. F.W. Pickens.”

There is light, even toning, along with two horizontal folds and smudging of ink to several letters of text.

OUT OF STOCK
 

POOR, ENOCH (1736-80)

# 7493

Brigadier General in the Continental Army during the American Revolution

Born in Andover, Massachusetts, a veteran of the French and Indian War, Poor settled in Exeter, New Hampshire after the war ended. He became colonel of the 2nd New Hampshire when recruits were called after the battles of Lexington and Concord. In the summer of 1775 the unit was incorporated into the Continental Army, and Poor subsequently served in the early-war invasion of Canada and at the battles of Saratoga, Bemis Heights, and Monmouth, his regiment having spent the winter of 1777 with Washington’s army at Valley Forge.

Revolutionary War-Date Signature, with rank, “Enoch Poor, B[rigadier Gen[era]l,” on a ¾” x 3 ½” slip of paper, probably removed from a letter, and dated to the period from Poor’s appointment to brigadier general on February 21, 1777 until his death, September 8, 1780. The signature is affixed to a heavier 5” x 7 ½” sheet, beneath a book image of Poor in military uniform, with printed biographical text also attached in the lower and upper margins.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PORTER, WILLIAM D. (1809-64)

# 5854

Union Commodore

A lifelong navy man, born in New Orleans, Porter commanded Union naval forces at Ft. Henry, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Baton Rouge. He held no active command after promotion to commodore and died on May 1, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with sentiment and the rank Porter held from July 15, 1862 until his death during the Civil War, “Yours Respectfully, W.D. Porter, Commodore, U.S. N[avy],” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PRESTON, JOHN S. (1809-81)

# 7533

Confederate Brigadier General - Virginia

A Virginia native and pre-war attorney, Preston served on the staff of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard during the bombardment of Ft. Sumter and at the battle of First Manassas. He later served in command of conscript and prison camps, and as superintendant of the Confederate Bureau of Conscription in Richmond.

War-Date Signature

Civil War-Date Signature, with the rank Preston held from April 23, 1863 until June 10, 1864 in another hand, Jno. S. Preston, Col[onel] A[ssistant] A[djutant] Genl. Com[man]d[in]g,” on a 2” x 4 ½” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

RANSOM, MATTHEW W. (1826-1904)

# 6825
Confederate Brigadier General -
North Carolina; U.S. Senator – North Carolina – 1875-92   
 
After enlisting as a private in the 1st North Carolina shortly after war broke out, Ransom led the 35th North Carolina from Seven Pines through the siege of Petersburg. He was wounded three times during the war, afterward serving as U.S. Senator from North Carolina, 1872-95.
 
“Let the Negroes have Christmas until Monday, that is long enough…”
 
War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 3 pages, on two 8 ½” x 10 ¾” sheets. 
 
From the Confederate encampment in northern Virginia, Ransom sorrowfully writes to his wife just a few days before Christmas of the war’s first winter, discussing gifts for her and their children, the death of their daughter, and his loneliness at being away during the holiday. Ransom’s very detailed instructions for the operation of his North Carolina plantation include treatment of the slaves, in part – “…Let the Negroes have Christmas until Monday, that is long enough. And tell Dr. Roberts to put everything at the neck in charge of Jack until the new overseer comes… Tell Mr. Cox to see that all my sheep are gathered up & to give an order that no other Negroes are to come on the place during the Holidays…”
In full:                                                                   Camp Bee, Dec. 21st [18]61

My precious wife -
 
Yesterday I wrote you a short note from Fredericksburg. I hope the Geese will go safely & amuse the dear boys. There was nothing in the place to send them for Christmas. I trust tho that you can get something for them. I can not find a nice shoe here for you. Mr. Schlop tho’ will surely get them for you. I ordered from Messrs. Donnan & Johnston, Petersburg 30 lbs. nice white sugar to be sent you. I guess you will need some candles, etc., if so let me know and I will send you the money, or you can write immediately to Messrs. D & J & direct them to send me the bill. Be sure & have what you wish. I wish so much that your sister may come up. There is no danger from the sickness.
 
I can not tell you how sadly disappointed I am in not being to see you at Christmas. Col. Stokes wishes to go home & as I have been absent since he was, it is right that I should give way.
 
You must not think of it tho, darling, for the time will soon pass and we will be together. As soon as he returns I will go & that will not be very long. And yet for me I almost dread to go home. I hate so much to undergo afresh the pangs the place will revive. And that sorrow has been so heavy that this disappointment, bitter as it is, seems like nothing. I am not, precious, like I was at all. This grief has changed the face of the whole world to me and I can not recover from it. I fear now that I can see but little more pleasure in anything, but I will try very hard to do right and that will make everything better. How dark the House must now be to you, My own dearest child, that sweet light removed forever. But it will be so blessed to meet her in a brighter world, as I pray we all may. But I am too sad this morning to write you. I still love you, Sweetest, more sacredly & true than ever. But Oh, I do miss our little daughter so much.
 
I am greatly provoked at Mr. Branch. But tell Dr. Roberts (the overseer), if Allen is not seriously injured, to sell Mr. B. two mules - at $150 each - either Molly, Jolly, Bet, Fan, Ruben, Prince, Jim, Kate, or Jenny Ribbons. He can take any two of them at $300. I will not part with the others.
 
Let the Negroes have Christmas until Monday, that is long enough. And tell Dr. Roberts to put everything at the neck in charge of Jack until the new overseer comes.
 
Tell Dr. Roberts to make Mr. Branch get up all the tools, etc. & give him a list of them.
 
I will send you the balance of Mr. B's pay in a few days, unless Allen is injured; if he is I do not mean to pay him.
 
Tell Mr. Cox to keep on with me. He & I will bargain when I get home.
 
If the New Overseer at the neck has no bedding, You must do the best you can for him, but ask the Dr. to persuade him to furnish his own furniture, if I have to pay $25 extra for it, or even more.
 
Make them at both places (the two plantations) go right on & save the crop after Christmas.
 
I shall write to Mr. Newsum to hire Crawford again. After Christmas, Jarrall & Allen must both return to the River.
 
I do not wish the hogs killed until I go home.
 
If Rom sends his mare to our house have her well attended to & not used.
 
Tell Mr. Cox to see that all my sheep are gotten up & to give an order that no other Negroes are to come on the place during the Holidays.
 
Ask Dr. Roberts to drive down every day to the neck & see that the mules are fed & watered & the hogs attended to. A few days neglect will ruin them.
 
And in everything, my precious darling, do the best you can & just as you wish. 
 
I am feeling too badly this morning to write. I will be home surely by 1st Feb. 
 
Kiss the darling boys for me & tell them how I love them. 
 
Do write very often. I am very well today, but sad. 
 
I will write you almost daily.
 
With my whole soul.
 
                                                                          Yours forever,
                                                                          M.W. Ransom

Both sheets bear light soiling and wear, and several tears, mostly at or near the usual folds, have been neatly repaired with archival tape on their reverses.

Price: $2700.00
Quantity: 
 

RUSSELL, DAVID A. (1820-64)

# 7284

Union Brigadier General – Massachusetts; Killed-in-Action at the Battle of Winchester

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Russell saw early-war service as colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry on the Peninsula and at Antietam. After promotion to brigadier general, he saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and at the battle of Winchester, where he was killed while leading a brigade on September 19, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “D.A. Russell, Brig. Genl.,” on a 1” x 2 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with light soiling and wear.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 6070

Union Major General - Virginia; U.S. Presidential Candidate - Whig Party - 1852

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Recommending Brevet Brigadier General Harvey Brown to War Secretary Stanton 

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, recommending an old army comrade, Colonel Harvey Brown, to War Secretary Edwin Stanton.

“N. York, Apl. 9 1862. Dear Sir: I beg to present to you Col. Harvey Brown, one of the most distinguished veterans of the army & whose last gallant achievement, at Ft. Pickens, seems to merit a special reward, like all his other services on whatever field. Col. B. has had fortune in respect to promotion which, I trust, the War Department may now be able to correct. With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Y[ou]r most Ob[edien]t Serv[an]t, Winfield Scott. Hon. E.M. Stanton, Sec. of War.”

A lifelong soldier, Brown had served in the Florida Seminole Wars and under Scott during the Mexican War. Having declined appointment to brigadier in the volunteer services, he was brevetted brigadier general, effective November 23, 1861, for gallant conduct in the command of Ft. Pickens, Florida during the Confederate attempts to take the Santa Rosa Island post. On April 5, 1862, Brown took command of the defenses of New York City and was later brevetted major general for his role in suppressing the Draft Riots there the following year.

Lightly and evenly toned, with small holes at corners and tape repairs to clean paper separation at the folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 
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