Historical Civil War Autographs
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War-Date Autographs, Documents & Letters

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50 Items.  Showing Items 41 thru 50.
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SEDGWICK, JOHN (1813-64)

# 6919

Union Major General - Connecticut

A West Point graduate, veteran of the Seminole and Mexican Wars, Sedgwick served with the Army of the Potomac from the Peninsula through Spotsylvania, where he was killed by a Confederate sharpshooter.

War-Date Document Signed, 3 ¾” x 8”, a manuscript pass for Lieutenant Henry J. Strait of the hard-fought 40th New York Infantry, also know as the Mozart Regiment. This early-war pass can be dated to the period before Sedgwick’s promotion to major general on July 25, 1862.

“Permission is hereby given Lieut[enant] H.J.Strait to visit Washington & Return to-day. By order of E.J. Riley, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g 40th N[ew] Y[ork] V[olunteers].  per J.H.B. Jenkins, Adj[utan]t’s Clerk. Approved, John Sedgwick, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Vol[unteer]s.”

There is light soiling and wear, paper separation at the center intersection of the usual folds, along with minor loss of paper in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHELLEY, CHARLES M. (1833-1907)

# 6819

Confederate Brigadier General - Alabama

A Tennessee native, Shelley recruited and led the 30th Alabama Infantry during the campaign and siege of Vicksburg, where he was captured and paroled. He subsequently saw action in all the battles of the Army of Tennessee from Chattanooga through Franklin, having been appointed brigadier general from September 17, 1864. After the war, Shelley served four consecutive terms as a Democratic U.S. Congressman from Alabama.

War-Date Endorsement Signed, “Approved & Respectfully forwarded. C.M. Shelley, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g,” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” portion of a Confederate document.

While post-war autographs of Shelley are common, war-date pieces are rarely encountered. There is light, even toning, along with heavy mounting remnants on the reverse.

Price: $750.00
Quantity: 
 

SHERMAN, ELLEN BOYLE EWING (1824-88)

# 6861

Wife of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman; Daughter of Thomas Ewing – Secretary of the Treasury – 1841; Secretary of the Interior – 1849-50

Mrs. Sherman Wants to Visit Her Husband at Vicksburg, during the Campaign to Take the City

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, to Union General Stephen A. Hurlbut. Writing from her Ohio home, Mrs. Sherman congratulates the chronically corrupt Hurlbut on his being able to remain in the Army, her well-connected father, Thomas Ewing, having used his political influence on Hurlbut’s behalf. She further encourages Hurlbut to write a memoir, and concludes by expressing a desire to visit her husband at the Union encampment opposite Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the Federal campaign to take the river city.


Lancaster, Ohio, March 16, 1863.

Maj[or] Gen[era]l Hurlbut.

Dear Sir,

On my return home from Cincinnati, on the 14th, I received your kind letter of the 8th inst[ant]. Permit me to offer my sincere congratulations upon your triumph over those who tried to get you out of the Service. We saw with great regret the efforts that were made against you & are therefore the more rejoiced at your success. Father gave his influence and did what he could in your favor before he left Washington and he felt pretty confident that your enemies would be unsuccessful. Although you have not left the Service may we not hope for the memoir you promise? Anything from your pen would be racy & full of interest. Those who participated in the fights ought to have their turn to write about them. We have had fictions enough, but people have grown so fond of them the truth would not relish unless very well presented. Will you do me the favor to have your man Lancy or your man ‘Friday’ deliver the accompanying letter. Would you be shocked to see me come down soon? Could I get to Young’s Point?

Very truly your friend,

Ellen E. Sherman.”


Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and the usual folds. There are three small, symmetrical holes at mid-right, apparently made while the letter was folded.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 7042

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

President Lincoln Appoints Henry Larcom Abott a Brevet Brigadier General

War-Date Document Signed, 8” x 10,” as Secretary of War, Washington, December 2, 1864, “E.M. Stanton,” a partly printed War Department letter informing 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Colonel Henry Larcom Abbott that he has been appointed to the rank of brevet brigadier general by President Lincoln, “…for gallant and distinguished services in the operations before Richmond and especially in the lines before Petersburg,” to rank from August 1, 1864.

A manuscript notation in the lower margin directs this letter through Army of the Potomac Commanding General George G. Meade.

Condition is very good, with light toning and the usual horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STEPHENS, ALEXANDER H. (1812-83)

# 6476

Confederate Vice President - Georgia

Despite his unionist stance as congressman from Georgia, Stephens followed his native state to the Confederacy, becoming a representative in the Provisional Congress, a position he retained even after assuming the Vice Presidency. After the war, he returned to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1873 through 1882. 

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, three pages on a folded 4” x 6 ¼” letter-sheet, as Confederate Vice President, recommending a young engineer, Assistant Master of the Confederate Armory at Richmond, Virginia, Amassa Ring, formerly in the employ of the armory at Harpers Ferry, to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. 

“Richmond, Va., 29 March 1862, His Excellency Joseph E. Brown, Milledgeville, Ga. Dear Sir, Mr. Amassa W. Ring, a engineer who is now 1st Ass[istan]t Master of the Confederate States Armory in this city wishes to get employment in the manufacture of arms in our state. I consider him well qualified – superior quality to Mr. Jones who I understand is now in the Service of the State. Mr. Ring is quite a mechanical genius – sober, young [?] comprehensive and combining in business some of the rarest and best qualities of a artful & practical man I ever saw combined in any one character. He was in the U.S. Coast Survey up to the secession of Ga. He after that went to Harpers Ferry & from there to this city. I feel assured if you have any business for such a man a better or fitter one cannot be got in the Confederacy if in the Government. Yours truly, Alexander H. Stephens.”

Just two weeks earlier, Union General George B. McClellan had begun floating the enormous Federal Army of the Potomac down the Chesapeake to the tip of the York-James Peninsula. Anticipating the imminent campaign to take Richmond, along with the possible evacuation of the city and abandonment of its military stores and production facilities, Stephens predictably takes a position favorable to his native state by suggesting Ring to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. Despite McClellan’s failure to take Richmond in the spring of 1862, much of the South’s war industry was soon shifted to less threatened areas, most notably to the Confederate States Armory at Macon, Georgia.

Lightly and evenly toned, with the usual folds; brushing, spotting and offsetting of ink throughout.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STEVENSON, CARTER L. (1817-88)

# 7547

Confederate Major General - Virginia

After entering Confederate service with the 53rd Virginia, Stevenson fought in the Kentucky campaign, at Vicksburg, and in all the battles of the Army of Tennessee from Chattanooga through Bentonville, except Franklin.

War-Date Endorsement Signed

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed, “Resp[ectfull]y forwarded, C.L. Stevenson, Major Genl. Com[man]d[ing],” on a 1 ¾” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a larger Confederate document.

OUT OF STOCK
 

VAN BUREN, MARTIN (1782-1862)

# 7650

Eighth U.S. President - 1837-41; U.S. Vice President – 1833-37; U.S. Secretary of State – 1829-31; Governor of New York - 1829

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 8”, two pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded letter-sheet. From his home in Kinderhook, New York, Van Buren sends details of an upcoming trip to an unnamed friend.


“Lindenwald, October 17th [18]61. Many thanks to you my dear Judge for your affectionate & obliging letter. I shall wait till after the election. I hope to be ready to leave home on the day after. I spend the night with you & I hope have the pleasure of your company to Clifton. I will drop you a line in advance. Present me most kindly to Mrs. Page, Mrs. Mumford & the young ladies, & believe me truly yours, M. Van Buren.” 
In excellent condition overall, the letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few superficial stains and three horizontal folds.

Price: $895.00
Quantity: 
 

WALKER, HENRY H. (1832-1912)

# 7542

Confederate Brigadier General – Virginia

A Virginia native and West Point graduate, Walker led the 40th Virginia Infantry during the Seven Days, where he was wounded twice at Gaines’ Mill. Returning to his unit after recovering from the wounds, he saw action at the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Court House, where a severe wound caused the amputation of his foot.  Unfit for further field duty, Walker held a command defending the Richmond & Danville Railroad during the final weeks of the war.

War-Date Signature

Civil War-Date Signature, with rank in another hand, "H.H. Walker, Brig. General,on a 1” x 3 ¾” slip of paper, removed from a larger letter or document.

There is old glue staining on the reverse, which bears the military docketing, “Aug. 1, 1863,” in an unidentified hand.

Price: $595.00
Quantity: 
 

WAYNE, HENRY C. (1815-83)

# 6822

Confederate Brigadier General – Georgia

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Wayne’s primary Civil War service was as adjutant and inspector general of Georgia.

War-Date Document Signed, Milledgeville, Georgia, August 10, 1863, “Henry C. Wayne,” as adjutant and inspector general of Confederate Georgia, an imprinted 8 ½” x 11” form informing “Lt. J[ames M.] Smith, Talbotton, Geo[rgia]” of his appointment to “2nd Lieut[enant] of the old Guard in the Six months troops for local defence” by Governor Joseph Brown.

The document is evenly toned, with several folds and light creases, along with a few superficial edge tears.

Price: $695.00
Quantity: 
 

WHARTON, JOHN A. (1828-65)

# 7532

Confederate Major General - Texas

Born in Tennessee, Wharton moved to Texas with his family at an early age. He was a member of the state secession convention, and entered Confederate service as captain in a company of the 8th Texas Cavalry – Colonel B.F. Terry’s Texas Rangers. Wharton was wounded at the battle of Shiloh, served in the Kentucky campaign of 1862, held a cavalry command under Forrest and Wheeler at Murfreesboro and Chickamauga, and served in the Trans-Mississippi near the war’s end. He was killed on April 6, 1865 by 2nd Texas Cavalry Colonel George W. Baylor in a quarrel at a Houston, Texas hotel.

War-Date Signature

Civil War-Date Signature, Jno. A. Wharton, Brig. Genl. Com[man]d[in]g Cav[alry] Brig[ade],” on a ¾” x 4 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a Confederate letter or document.

OUT OF STOCK
 
50 Items.  Showing Items 41 thru 50.
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