Historical Civil War Autographs
 

 

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CRITTENDEN, JOHN J. (1787-1863)

# 7774

U.S. Attorney General - 1841 & 1850-53; U.S. Congressman – Kentucky – 1861-63; U.S. Senator – Kentucky – 1817-19, 1835-48 & 1855-61; Governor of Kentucky – 1848-50; Veteran of the War of 1812

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, July 13, 1861
The lifelong Kentucky Congressman remains in Washington, D.C. during the early days of the War

Autograph Letter Signed, 4 ½” x 5 ¾”, penned across lined paper, as U.S. Senator from Kentucky.

In the presidential election of 1860, Crittenden had backed John Bell, the nominee of the newly formed Constitutional Union Party. Believing that the secession crisis could be averted, he submitted a package of resolutions and constitutional amendments that came to be known as the Crittenden Compromise. As the plan allowed the spread of slavery into the new territories, it was adamantly opposed by newly elected President Abraham Lincoln, and votes on the provisions were blocked by Republicans in the Senate. Crittenden continued to work for reunification and the suspension of hostilities even after war broke out. President Lincoln called a special session of Congress on July 1, 1861, and this seemingly routine request of two weeks later to settle his account for lodging is undoubtedly due to Crittenden’s desire to remain in closest proximity to his congressional colleagues in Washington, D.C. Two of Crittenden’s sons served as general officers during the Civil War: George B. Crittenden resigned his U.S. Army commission and joined the Confederate States Army; Thomas L. Crittenden rose to the rank of major general in the Union Army.


“Messrs. F. Tenney & Co. Necessity of frequent consultation with my colleagues in Congress will oblige me, for the brief period of the present session, to take boarding with them. Be pleased therefore to send my bill up to & including today. Very respectfully, J.J. Crittenden, Washington, Friday – 13th July 1861.”


The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few superficial stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HANCOCK, JOHN (1737-93)

# 6546

Signer of the Declaration of Independence; President of the Continental Congress; Governor of Massachusetts - 1780-85 & 1787-93

Signature, “John Hancock…” on a 1 ¼” x 4 ½” slip of paper, with the period notation, March 27, 1780,” in an unidentified hand above.

The slip bears general soiling and wear, the irregularly clipped left edge has been filled, and there are old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HOOVER, J. EDGAR (1895-1972)

# 7156

First Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation – 1935-72

Typed Letter Signed, on 8” x 10” imprinted stationery as director of the F.B.I., a letter of commendation for agents involved in an investigation.

"Washington, D.C.20535, December 29, 1971. Mr. William M. Alexander, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Jacksonville, Florida. Dear Mr. Alexander: I would like to commend, though you, the Agent personnel of your division who participated so effectively in the investigation of Raymond David Wright and others, the subjects of Unlawful Flight to Avoid Prosecution cases. Everyone approached his responsibilities in a tireless and determined fashion in order to contribute materially to the success accomplished. I ask that you express my appreciation to all concerned. Sincerely yours, J. Edgar Hoover.

The letter is in excellent condition, with the usual horizontal folds and two spindle holes in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

KIRKWOOD, SAMUEL J. (1813-94)

# 7835

U.S. Interior Secretary – 1881-82; U.S. Senator – Iowa – 1866-67 & 1877-81; Governor of Iowa – 1860-64 & 1876-77

As Civil War Governor of Iowa, refused Virginia’s extradition of Barclay Coppock, a participant in John Brown’s Raid on Harpers Ferry


Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, “S.J. Kirkwood, Oct. 27/[18]87.”

Gilt-edged and virtually pristine, with a prefabricated, folded-back upper left corner, the card is affixed to larger backing.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LAFAYETTE, MARQUIS DE (1757-1834)

# 6491

French Soldier & Statesman; Hero of the American Revolution

Autograph Note Signed, 1 ¾” x 4 ½”, undated. Given only Lafayette’s postscript reference to “Mrs. Armstrong,” the recipient of the note cannot be identified with certainty.

“Altho I learn…Your Voyage it pains me much to …with you, My dear friend, and with the confidential conversations we had on every American concerns on this side of the Atlantic, as well as on many European subjects. Whatever distance of place passes us, I shall remain Your affectionate friend, Lafayette. My best respects to Mrs. Armstrong.”

The lightly soiled note has been affixed to a 5” x 7 ½” letter-sheet, with the manuscript notation, “La Fayette,” above.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LANE, FRANKLIN K. (1864-1921)

# 7765

U.S. Secretary of the Interior – 1913-20; Chairman of the Interstate Commerce Commission - 1913

Typed Letter Signed, on imprinted 5 ½” x 9” stationery as U.S. Secretary of the Interior, to “Mr. John A. Stewart, 50 Church Street, New York City.”

“April 11, 1913. Dear Mr. Stewart: Your first letter, to which you refer in the present one of April 9, must have miscarried for I never received it. I appreciate the invitation to become an Honorary Vice-Chairman of the Committee for the Celebration of the One Hundredth Anniversary of Peace Among English-Speaking peoples. I am glad to accept on condition that the place is purely honorary, for as you know I am too busy with the work of the Department to give any real attention to other matters such as I would like to. Cordially yours, Franklin K. Lane.

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds and several light stains and creases. There is an old paper clip indentation in the upper right corner.

Price: $40.00
List Price: $40.00
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MARTIN, CHARLES H. (1863-1946)

# 7768

Governor of Oregon – 1935-39

U.S. Congressman – Oregon – 1931-35

Served in the Spanish-American War & lead the Blackhawk Division in the Argonne during World War I, for which he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal

Supported segregation and Jim Crow regulations in the U.S. Army

Commander of the Panama Canal Department – 1925-27

Retired as U.S. Army Major General in 1927


Signed Card, 3 ¼” x 5”, also dated by Martin as Oregon governor.

“Charles H. Martin, Gov[erno]r of Oregon, Salem, Nov[ember] 9th 1936.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with bleeding of ink in Martin’s middle initial, and there are old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 6070

Union Major General - Virginia; U.S. Presidential Candidate - Whig Party - 1852

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Recommending Brevet Brigadier General Harvey Brown to War Secretary Stanton 

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, recommending an old army comrade, Colonel Harvey Brown, to War Secretary Edwin Stanton.

“N. York, Apl. 9 1862. Dear Sir: I beg to present to you Col. Harvey Brown, one of the most distinguished veterans of the army & whose last gallant achievement, at Ft. Pickens, seems to merit a special reward, like all his other services on whatever field. Col. B. has had fortune in respect to promotion which, I trust, the War Department may now be able to correct. With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Y[ou]r most Ob[edien]t Serv[an]t, Winfield Scott. Hon. E.M. Stanton, Sec. of War.”

A lifelong soldier, Brown had served in the Florida Seminole Wars and under Scott during the Mexican War. Having declined appointment to brigadier in the volunteer services, he was brevetted brigadier general, effective November 23, 1861, for gallant conduct in the command of Ft. Pickens, Florida during the Confederate attempts to take the Santa Rosa Island post. On April 5, 1862, Brown took command of the defenses of New York City and was later brevetted major general for his role in suppressing the Draft Riots there the following year.

Lightly and evenly toned, with small holes at corners and tape repairs to clean paper separation at the folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WOLCOTT, OLIVER, JR. (1760-1833)

# 7825

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1795-1800; Governor of Connecticut – 1817-27; Revolutionary War Deputy Quartermaster General

Free-Frank as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President John Adams

Franked Address Panel, 7 ¾” x 9”, as U.S. Treasury Secretary, “Free, Oliv[er] Wolcott,” addressed in another hand, to “William Tuck, Esquire, Collector, Gloucester, Massachusetts.” With stamped postmark and free designations, docketing at the right edge is consistent with Wolcott’s tenure as treasury secretary, “18 Dec[ember] 1799, Sec[retar]y of the Treasury, rec[eip]t for $130.44. Marine hospital Money.”

The paper is lightly and evenly toned, with scattered stains. The text is unaffected by several holes, one in the upper margin associated with the opening of the wax seal, weakness and separation at the folds, and heavier staining along the lower edge.

OUT OF STOCK