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War-Date Autographs, Documents & Letters

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40 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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JOHNSTON, OLIN D. (1896-1965)

# 7786

Governor of South Carolina – 1935-39 & 1943-45; U.S. Senator – South Carolina – 1945-65

                                         World War II Date Letter

Typed Letter Signed, on official 8 ½” x 11” stationery as governor of South Carolina, thanking U.S. Postmaster General Frank C. Walker for congratulations extended upon Johnston’s election to the U.S. Senate.


                                             State of South Carolina, Office of the Governor
                                                   Columbia, November 22, 1944

Hon[orable] Frank C. Walker
Postmaster General
Washington, D.C.

Dear Frank:

                  I wish to thank you for your letter of congratulations in regard to my election to the United States Senate. I shall always cherish your friendship.

                                                                                        With kind regards, I am,

                                                                                                     Sincerely yours,

                                                                                                Olin D. Johnston

                                                                                                        Olin D. Johnston
                                                                                                             Governor


Accompanied by the transmittal envelope, the letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the expected folds. A stamp of the postmaster general’s office at upper right indicates the letter was received on November 24, 1944.

Was: $40.00  SALE Price:  $30.00
List Price: $40.00
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LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6379

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

A Request for a Lieutenant’s Promotion – Just Two Months Before He was Mortally Wounded at Cedar Creek

Civil War-Date Autograph Note Signed, as President on a 5” x 8” sheet of Executive Mansion stationery, beneath a request from F.H. Baldwin for the promotion of his brother, a lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Artillery.

“The above, written by a very good man, is submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln.”

Noted as a resident of Allentown, Pennsylvania in the accompanying National Archives records, Mr. Baldwin was undoubtedly a caller at the Executive Mansion, and was directed to write his request, hoping that President Lincoln would approve and advance it through the proper channels. His letter, accomplished in pencil, in full:

Aug. 12th 1864. To His Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the U.S. I desire the transfer or promotion of my brother, Lt. Henry M. Baldwin, Battery M, 5th Reg[imen]t U.S. Artillery, to any vacancy in the Regt. which you may decide it possible to place him, consistent with the good of the service. Very Resp[ectfull]y, F.H. Baldwin.”

There is no record of Lieutenant Baldwin’s promotion or transfer before he was severely wounded through the chest and left arm on October 19, 1864 – just two months later - at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He died on November 8, 1864 at Sheridan Hospital, near Winchester, Virginia.

The letter is in excellent condition, with creases from two vertical folds.                                                                                      

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6678

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Document Signed, 15” x 19”, as President, Washington, July 29, 1861, “Abraham Lincoln,” a partly printed appointment for “…Stephen Brooks…Surveyor of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Countersigned by the Secretary of the Treasury, “S.P. Chase.”

The document is in excellent overall condition, with light age toning and several minor paper breaks at the intersections of the usual folds. Both signatures are distinct and free from flaw in every respect.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6679

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Franked Envelope, 3” x 5 ¼”, as President, “A. Lincoln.” The envelope is also addressed by Lincoln, to “Rev[erend] Z.P. Wilds, 120 Prince Street, New York,” and has a June 21, 1862, Washington postmark.

The previous day, Lincoln met with a six-member delegation of Progressive Friends, composed of Thomas Garrett, Alice Eliza Hambleton, Oliver Johnson, Dinah Mendenhall, William Barnard, and Eliza Agnew. The group presented the President with a memorial, urging him to decree the emancipation of the slaves, the position adopted at the Friends’ annual meeting. It is quite worthy of note that Lincoln wrote Reverend Wilds, well known as a longtime missionary to the poor of New York City, the day following his meeting with this group of prominent leaders in the Abolition and Underground Railroad movements.

Set into an attractive, inlaid pedestal frame, the envelope bears general soiling and wear, along with minor paper loss along the right edge and above the somewhat smudged postmark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LONGSTREET, JAMES (1821-1904)

# 7517

Confederate Lieutenant General – South Carolina

Longstreet saw action from First Manassas through Appomattox, becoming Lee’s senior lieutenant general in the Army of Northern Virginia. He held post-war positions in the Grant, McKinley, and Roosevelt administrations.

War-Date Endorsement Signed

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

Respectfully forwarded, J. Longstreet, L[ieutenan]t Gen[era]l.”

While post-war manuscripts by Longstreet are readily available, war-date examples are seldom encountered. This endorsement, distinctly signed by Longstreet with his right hand, can be dated to the war-time period before the Battle of the Wilderness, May 5 & 6, 1864, where a severe wound forced Longstreet to use his left hand for writing for many years afterward.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCLELLAN, MARY ELLEN MARCY (1836-1915)

# 5797

Wife of Union General George B. McClellan; Daughter of Union General Randolph B. Marcy

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on separate sheets of a folded 3 ½” x 5 ½” embossed personal letter-sheet, responding to a request for her husband’s autograph. 

“Mr. Renshaw – I regret that I have no note of Genl. McClellan’s that I can give away – and when asked for his autographs am obliged to send merely his signature. If this will afford you any gratification I am very happy to enclose it to you. Yours & c, M.E. McClellan. New York City, May 19th/[18]62.”

At the time, General McClellan had completed his tentative advance up the York-James Peninsula to threaten Richmond, and he had written to his wife frequently during the month-long campaign. The letters which Mrs. McClellan was unwilling to part with would have undoubtedly contained significant insight into both the movement of the Army of the Potomac and her husband’s frustration at the continuous urging of President Lincoln for more aggressive action against the outnumbered Confederate defenders.

Lightly and evenly toned, with several light folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McPHERSON, JAMES B. (1828-64)

# 6887

Union Major General - Ohio

An 1853 graduate of West Point, McPherson entered the war as first lieutenant of engineers, seeing action at Forts Henry & Donelson, Shiloh, and Corinth. As major general of volunteers, he commanded the 17th Corps through the Vicksburg Campaign, winning the praise of both Grant and Sherman. McPherson was killed-in-action on July 22,1864, during Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “Jas. B. McPherson, Maj. Genl.” on a 1 ½” x 3 ¾” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NIMITZ, CHESTER W. (1885-1966)

# 7155

U.S. Navy Admiral; Commander-in-Chief of the United States Pacific Fleet – 1941-45

During the Final Months of World War II, Nimitz Expresses Support for a Rehabilitation Center for Wounded Veterans on Staten Island – Modeled after FDR’s Facility at Warm Springs, Georgia

War-Date Typed Letter Signed, 8” x 10 ½”, on imprinted stationery as Commander of the United States Pacific Fleet during World War II, to “Irving Geist, 1372 Broadway, New York, New York.”

Writing from his Advance Headquarters on Guam during the final months of the war, Nimitz expresses support for “constructing swimming pools, similar to those at Warm Springs,” the facility founded by Franklin Roosevelt in Georgia to treat victims of polio, for the rehabilitation of wounded World War II veterans at the Halloran General Hospital on Staten Island. He further declines to submit a statement and a photograph for publication, due to the demands of the war. A well-known New York philanthropist, Geist had committed to the task of raising the estimated $150,000 to finance the project at Halloran General Hospital the previous year.


1 June 1945.

Dear Mr Geist:

This will acknowledge your letter of 3 May 1945, which has just reached my Advance Headquarters at Guam.  You may be certain that measures undertaken for the benefit of our returning wounded veterans have my most sympathetic approval. I congratulate you and the men associated with you on your project for constructing swimming pools, similar to those at Warm Springs, for the Halloran General Hospital and I hope and believe that they will prove beneficial to the men for whose use they are intended.

The increasing momentum of the Pacific war has made so many demands upon my time that I have been obliged to adopt a policy of not making statements for publication in connection with endeavors which are not of national scope, however worthwhile such endeavors may be. Therefore I must regretfully decline your request that my photograph and a statement from me be sent for publication in the Dedication Journal.

I deeply appreciate the patriotic motive which prompted you in making the request and offer you my good wishes for the success of your endeavor.

Sincerely yours,

C.W. Nimitz,

C.W. NIMITZ
Fleet Admiral, U.S. Navy.”


Originally planned in 1938 as a treatment center for children with developmental disabilities, Willowbrook State School was renamed Halloran General Hospital after the late Colonel Paul Stacey Halloran, and served as a treatment center for returning wounded veterans from 1942 through 1947.

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds, and there are two pinholes and a light paper clip indentation in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PICKENS, FRANCIS W. (1805-69)

# 6855

Confederate Governor of South Carolina – 1860-62; U.S. Congressman – South Carolina – 1834-43

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, on imprinted stationery as Confederate Governor of South Carolina. Shortly after the outbreak of war, Pickens instructs the commissary general in the payment and distribution of rations for troops in the new South Carolina regiments.

4 June 1861To Commissary Gen[era]l Walker. Sir, I rec[eive]d yours of this inst[ant]. Capt[ain] Elliot’s company appear to have rec[eive]d rations at 40 c[en]ts – and the service was for twenty four days – and the highest Army ration is 30 c[en]ts. The $488.10 is the highest one paid. This of course includes beef & vegetables, & the bill for $151.75 cannot be allowed. As to temporary supplies to Gen[era]l Garlington, Col[one]l Rion, and Col[one]l Blandings command, you might furnish for a day or so. Please see that the supplies left by Cash’s reg[imen]t at Florence are taken care of & held or brought to the city, & so of Burns & Jenkins & all the other reg[imen]ts. F.W. Pickens.”

There is light, even toning, along with two horizontal folds and smudging of ink to several letters of text.

OUT OF STOCK
 

POOR, ENOCH (1736-80)

# 7493

Brigadier General in the Continental Army during the American Revolution

Born in Andover, Massachusetts, a veteran of the French and Indian War, Poor settled in Exeter, New Hampshire after the war ended. He became colonel of the 2nd New Hampshire when recruits were called after the battles of Lexington and Concord. In the summer of 1775 the unit was incorporated into the Continental Army, and Poor subsequently served in the early-war invasion of Canada and at the battles of Saratoga, Bemis Heights, and Monmouth, his regiment having spent the winter of 1777 with Washington’s army at Valley Forge.

Revolutionary War-Date Signature, with rank, “Enoch Poor, B[rigadier Gen[era]l,” on a ¾” x 3 ½” slip of paper, probably removed from a letter, and dated to the period from Poor’s appointment to brigadier general on February 21, 1777 until his death, September 8, 1780. The signature is affixed to a heavier 5” x 7 ½” sheet, beneath a book image of Poor in military uniform, with printed biographical text also attached in the lower and upper margins.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PORTER, WILLIAM D. (1809-64)

# 5854

Union Commodore

A lifelong navy man, born in New Orleans, Porter commanded Union naval forces at Ft. Henry, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Baton Rouge. He held no active command after promotion to commodore and died on May 1, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with sentiment and the rank Porter held from July 15, 1862 until his death during the Civil War, “Yours Respectfully, W.D. Porter, Commodore, U.S. N[avy],” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PRESTON, JOHN S. (1809-81)

# 7533

Confederate Brigadier General - Virginia

A Virginia native and pre-war attorney, Preston served on the staff of Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard during the bombardment of Ft. Sumter and at the battle of First Manassas. He later served in command of conscript and prison camps, and as superintendant of the Confederate Bureau of Conscription in Richmond.

War-Date Signature

Civil War-Date Signature, with the rank Preston held from April 23, 1863 until June 10, 1864 in another hand, Jno. S. Preston, Col[onel] A[ssistant] A[djutant] Genl. Com[man]d[in]g,” on a 2” x 4 ½” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

RUSSELL, DAVID A. (1820-64)

# 7284

Union Brigadier General – Massachusetts; Killed-in-Action at the Battle of Winchester

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Russell saw early-war service as colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry on the Peninsula and at Antietam. After promotion to brigadier general, he saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and at the battle of Winchester, where he was killed while leading a brigade on September 19, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “D.A. Russell, Brig. Genl.,” on a 1” x 2 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with light soiling and wear.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 6070

Union Major General - Virginia; U.S. Presidential Candidate - Whig Party - 1852

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Recommending Brevet Brigadier General Harvey Brown to War Secretary Stanton 

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, recommending an old army comrade, Colonel Harvey Brown, to War Secretary Edwin Stanton.

“N. York, Apl. 9 1862. Dear Sir: I beg to present to you Col. Harvey Brown, one of the most distinguished veterans of the army & whose last gallant achievement, at Ft. Pickens, seems to merit a special reward, like all his other services on whatever field. Col. B. has had fortune in respect to promotion which, I trust, the War Department may now be able to correct. With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Y[ou]r most Ob[edien]t Serv[an]t, Winfield Scott. Hon. E.M. Stanton, Sec. of War.”

A lifelong soldier, Brown had served in the Florida Seminole Wars and under Scott during the Mexican War. Having declined appointment to brigadier in the volunteer services, he was brevetted brigadier general, effective November 23, 1861, for gallant conduct in the command of Ft. Pickens, Florida during the Confederate attempts to take the Santa Rosa Island post. On April 5, 1862, Brown took command of the defenses of New York City and was later brevetted major general for his role in suppressing the Draft Riots there the following year.

Lightly and evenly toned, with small holes at corners and tape repairs to clean paper separation at the folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SEDGWICK, JOHN (1813-64)

# 6919

Union Major General - Connecticut

A West Point graduate, veteran of the Seminole and Mexican Wars, Sedgwick served with the Army of the Potomac from the Peninsula through Spotsylvania, where he was killed by a Confederate sharpshooter.

War-Date Document Signed, 3 ¾” x 8”, a manuscript pass for Lieutenant Henry J. Strait of the hard-fought 40th New York Infantry, also know as the Mozart Regiment. This early-war pass can be dated to the period before Sedgwick’s promotion to major general on July 25, 1862.

“Permission is hereby given Lieut[enant] H.J.Strait to visit Washington & Return to-day. By order of E.J. Riley, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g 40th N[ew] Y[ork] V[olunteers].  per J.H.B. Jenkins, Adj[utan]t’s Clerk. Approved, John Sedgwick, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Vol[unteer]s.”

There is light soiling and wear, paper separation at the center intersection of the usual folds, along with minor loss of paper in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHERMAN, ELLEN BOYLE EWING (1824-88)

# 6861

Wife of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman; Daughter of Thomas Ewing – Secretary of the Treasury – 1841; Secretary of the Interior – 1849-50

Mrs. Sherman Wants to Visit Her Husband at Vicksburg, during the Campaign to Take the City

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, to Union General Stephen A. Hurlbut. Writing from her Ohio home, Mrs. Sherman congratulates the chronically corrupt Hurlbut on his being able to remain in the Army, her well-connected father, Thomas Ewing, having used his political influence on Hurlbut’s behalf. She further encourages Hurlbut to write a memoir, and concludes by expressing a desire to visit her husband at the Union encampment opposite Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the Federal campaign to take the river city.


Lancaster, Ohio, March 16, 1863.

Maj[or] Gen[era]l Hurlbut.

Dear Sir,

On my return home from Cincinnati, on the 14th, I received your kind letter of the 8th inst[ant]. Permit me to offer my sincere congratulations upon your triumph over those who tried to get you out of the Service. We saw with great regret the efforts that were made against you & are therefore the more rejoiced at your success. Father gave his influence and did what he could in your favor before he left Washington and he felt pretty confident that your enemies would be unsuccessful. Although you have not left the Service may we not hope for the memoir you promise? Anything from your pen would be racy & full of interest. Those who participated in the fights ought to have their turn to write about them. We have had fictions enough, but people have grown so fond of them the truth would not relish unless very well presented. Will you do me the favor to have your man Lancy or your man ‘Friday’ deliver the accompanying letter. Would you be shocked to see me come down soon? Could I get to Young’s Point?

Very truly your friend,

Ellen E. Sherman.”


Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and the usual folds. There are three small, symmetrical holes at mid-right, apparently made while the letter was folded.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 7042

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

President Lincoln Appoints Henry Larcom Abott a Brevet Brigadier General

War-Date Document Signed, 8” x 10,” as Secretary of War, Washington, December 2, 1864, “E.M. Stanton,” a partly printed War Department letter informing 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Colonel Henry Larcom Abbott that he has been appointed to the rank of brevet brigadier general by President Lincoln, “…for gallant and distinguished services in the operations before Richmond and especially in the lines before Petersburg,” to rank from August 1, 1864.

A manuscript notation in the lower margin directs this letter through Army of the Potomac Commanding General George G. Meade.

Condition is very good, with light toning and the usual horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STEPHENS, ALEXANDER H. (1812-83)

# 6476

Confederate Vice President - Georgia

Despite his unionist stance as congressman from Georgia, Stephens followed his native state to the Confederacy, becoming a representative in the Provisional Congress, a position he retained even after assuming the Vice Presidency. After the war, he returned to the U.S. House of Representatives from 1873 through 1882. 

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, three pages on a folded 4” x 6 ¼” letter-sheet, as Confederate Vice President, recommending a young engineer, Assistant Master of the Confederate Armory at Richmond, Virginia, Amassa Ring, formerly in the employ of the armory at Harpers Ferry, to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. 

“Richmond, Va., 29 March 1862, His Excellency Joseph E. Brown, Milledgeville, Ga. Dear Sir, Mr. Amassa W. Ring, a engineer who is now 1st Ass[istan]t Master of the Confederate States Armory in this city wishes to get employment in the manufacture of arms in our state. I consider him well qualified – superior quality to Mr. Jones who I understand is now in the Service of the State. Mr. Ring is quite a mechanical genius – sober, young [?] comprehensive and combining in business some of the rarest and best qualities of a artful & practical man I ever saw combined in any one character. He was in the U.S. Coast Survey up to the secession of Ga. He after that went to Harpers Ferry & from there to this city. I feel assured if you have any business for such a man a better or fitter one cannot be got in the Confederacy if in the Government. Yours truly, Alexander H. Stephens.”

Just two weeks earlier, Union General George B. McClellan had begun floating the enormous Federal Army of the Potomac down the Chesapeake to the tip of the York-James Peninsula. Anticipating the imminent campaign to take Richmond, along with the possible evacuation of the city and abandonment of its military stores and production facilities, Stephens predictably takes a position favorable to his native state by suggesting Ring to Georgia Governor Joseph E. Brown. Despite McClellan’s failure to take Richmond in the spring of 1862, much of the South’s war industry was soon shifted to less threatened areas, most notably to the Confederate States Armory at Macon, Georgia.

Lightly and evenly toned, with the usual folds; brushing, spotting and offsetting of ink throughout.

OUT OF STOCK
 

VAN BUREN, MARTIN (1782-1862)

# 7650

Eighth U.S. President - 1837-41; U.S. Vice President – 1833-37; U.S. Secretary of State – 1829-31; Governor of New York - 1829

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 8”, two pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded letter-sheet. From his home in Kinderhook, New York, Van Buren sends details of an upcoming trip to an unnamed friend.


“Lindenwald, October 17th [18]61. Many thanks to you my dear Judge for your affectionate & obliging letter. I shall wait till after the election. I hope to be ready to leave home on the day after. I spend the night with you & I hope have the pleasure of your company to Clifton. I will drop you a line in advance. Present me most kindly to Mrs. Page, Mrs. Mumford & the young ladies, & believe me truly yours, M. Van Buren.” 
In excellent condition overall, the letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few superficial stains and three horizontal folds.

Price: $895.00
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WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 7826

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69, During the American Civil War

Civil War-Date Letter – Navy Secretary Welles devotes his attention to the Union Blockade

Letter Signed, 7 ¾” x 9 ¾”, with the closing and signature on the reverse, to “James T. Hale, Esq[uire], Washington, D.C.”  Responding to an inquiry from the Pennsylvania congressman, Welles conveys that the foreign fleet has been recalled, understandably preferring to devote all funds and resources available to the U.S. Navy to the Union blockade of the southern states, announced by President Lincoln on April 19, 1861.


“Navy Department, Sept[embe]r 21, 1861.  Sir: Your letter of the 20th inst[ant] has been received.  I have not time to revise the arrangement, at one time proposed with Mr. James McHenry, in regard to funds for our foreign squadrons, referred to by you.  It seems unnecessary, for the arrangement was never consummated by my predecessor, nor has it been recognized, at any time, by this Department.  In addition to this our squadrons have been recalled, rendering any change needless.  I am respectfully. Y[ou]r Obed[ien]t servant, Gideon Welles.”


The paper is lightly and evenly toned, with staining and a few pinholes and light creases in the margins, along with two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 
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