Historical Civil War Autographs
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Civil War - The Union

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79 Items.  Showing Items 61 thru 79.
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ROSECRANS, WILLIAM S. (1819-98)

# 6645

Union Major General – Ohio; U.S. Congressman – California – 1881-85

Rosecrans led the Army of the Cumberland at Murfreesboro and through the Tullahoma campaign to Chickamauga, where he was routed by the Confederates under Longstreet, a misadventure which effectively ended his military career. After the war, he settled near Los Angeles, serving as U.S. Congressman from California, 1881 – 1885.

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with rank, “W.S. Rosecrans, Maj[or] Genl.”

There is general soiling and wear, along with a few pinholes and light creases.

OUT OF STOCK
 

RUSSELL, DAVID A. (1820-64)

# 7284

Union Brigadier General – Massachusetts; Killed-in-Action at the Battle of Winchester

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Russell saw early-war service as colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry on the Peninsula and at Antietam. After promotion to brigadier general, he saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and at the battle of Winchester, where he was killed while leading a brigade on September 19, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “D.A. Russell, Brig. Genl.,” on a 1” x 2 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with light soiling and wear.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 6070

Union Major General - Virginia; U.S. Presidential Candidate - Whig Party - 1852

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Recommending Brevet Brigadier General Harvey Brown to War Secretary Stanton 

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, recommending an old army comrade, Colonel Harvey Brown, to War Secretary Edwin Stanton.

“N. York, Apl. 9 1862. Dear Sir: I beg to present to you Col. Harvey Brown, one of the most distinguished veterans of the army & whose last gallant achievement, at Ft. Pickens, seems to merit a special reward, like all his other services on whatever field. Col. B. has had fortune in respect to promotion which, I trust, the War Department may now be able to correct. With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Y[ou]r most Ob[edien]t Serv[an]t, Winfield Scott. Hon. E.M. Stanton, Sec. of War.”

A lifelong soldier, Brown had served in the Florida Seminole Wars and under Scott during the Mexican War. Having declined appointment to brigadier in the volunteer services, he was brevetted brigadier general, effective November 23, 1861, for gallant conduct in the command of Ft. Pickens, Florida during the Confederate attempts to take the Santa Rosa Island post. On April 5, 1862, Brown took command of the defenses of New York City and was later brevetted major general for his role in suppressing the Draft Riots there the following year.

Lightly and evenly toned, with small holes at corners and tape repairs to clean paper separation at the folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 7149

Union Major General – Virginia; U.S. Army Brevet Lieutenant General for Service in the Mexican War

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Signature, with the brevet rank Scott held from his service in the Mexican War, “Free, Winfield Scott, Lieut[enant] Genl., &c.,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” portion of an envelope front.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SEDGWICK, JOHN (1813-64)

# 6919

Union Major General - Connecticut

A West Point graduate, veteran of the Seminole and Mexican Wars, Sedgwick served with the Army of the Potomac from the Peninsula through Spotsylvania, where he was killed by a Confederate sharpshooter.

War-Date Document Signed, 3 ¾” x 8”, a manuscript pass for Lieutenant Henry J. Strait of the hard-fought 40th New York Infantry, also know as the Mozart Regiment. This early-war pass can be dated to the period before Sedgwick’s promotion to major general on July 25, 1862.

“Permission is hereby given Lieut[enant] H.J.Strait to visit Washington & Return to-day. By order of E.J. Riley, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g 40th N[ew] Y[ork] V[olunteers].  per J.H.B. Jenkins, Adj[utan]t’s Clerk. Approved, John Sedgwick, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Vol[unteer]s.”

There is light soiling and wear, paper separation at the center intersection of the usual folds, along with minor loss of paper in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHERMAN, ELLEN BOYLE EWING (1824-88)

# 6861

Wife of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman; Daughter of Thomas Ewing – Secretary of the Treasury – 1841; Secretary of the Interior – 1849-50

Mrs. Sherman Wants to Visit Her Husband at Vicksburg, during the Campaign to Take the City

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, to Union General Stephen A. Hurlbut. Writing from her Ohio home, Mrs. Sherman congratulates the chronically corrupt Hurlbut on his being able to remain in the Army, her well-connected father, Thomas Ewing, having used his political influence on Hurlbut’s behalf. She further encourages Hurlbut to write a memoir, and concludes by expressing a desire to visit her husband at the Union encampment opposite Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the Federal campaign to take the river city.


Lancaster, Ohio, March 16, 1863.

Maj[or] Gen[era]l Hurlbut.

Dear Sir,

On my return home from Cincinnati, on the 14th, I received your kind letter of the 8th inst[ant]. Permit me to offer my sincere congratulations upon your triumph over those who tried to get you out of the Service. We saw with great regret the efforts that were made against you & are therefore the more rejoiced at your success. Father gave his influence and did what he could in your favor before he left Washington and he felt pretty confident that your enemies would be unsuccessful. Although you have not left the Service may we not hope for the memoir you promise? Anything from your pen would be racy & full of interest. Those who participated in the fights ought to have their turn to write about them. We have had fictions enough, but people have grown so fond of them the truth would not relish unless very well presented. Will you do me the favor to have your man Lancy or your man ‘Friday’ deliver the accompanying letter. Would you be shocked to see me come down soon? Could I get to Young’s Point?

Very truly your friend,

Ellen E. Sherman.”


Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and the usual folds. There are three small, symmetrical holes at mid-right, apparently made while the letter was folded.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHERMAN, WILLIAM TECUMSEH (1820-91)

# 6886

Union Major General - Ohio

An 1840 West Point graduate, Sherman was superintendent of what is now LSU when war broke out in 1861. He resigned when Confederates seized the U.S. arsenal in Baton Rouge, shortly thereafter reentering the army. Early lack of success in Kentucky was soon offset by distinguished service at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Chattanooga, Atlanta, and in the “March to the Sea.”

Signature, with rank and date, “W.T. Sherman, General, 1888,” on the reverse of Sherman’s 2” x 3 ½” calling card.

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SICKLES, DANIEL E. (1819-1914)

# 5943

Union Major General - New York; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the Battle of Gettysburg

Sickles lost a leg and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor as a result of his action in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Typed Letter Signed, 8” x 11”, to Isaac P. Gragg, a Union veteran who saw Civil War service with the 1st and 61st Massachusetts Volunteers, accepting an invitation to attend a ceremony dedicating a statue of Union General Joseph Hooker.

“23 Fifth Ave., New York, May 19, 1903. Capt. Isaac P. Gragg, Secretary, etc, Room 453, State House, Boston. Captain: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation, conveyed by you in behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to attend the dedication of an Equestrian Statue to Major General Joseph Hooker, on Thursday, June 25th, proximo. I have much satisfaction in accepting this invitation and expect to be present on that interesting occasion. Very sincerely yours, D.E. Sickles.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few stains and the usual folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SICKLES, DANIEL E. (1819-1914)

# 6927

Union Major General - New York; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the Battle of Gettysburg

Sickles lost a leg and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor as a result of his action in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Signature, with rank and date, “Autograph of D.E. Sickles, Maj[or] Gen]era]l U.S. Army, New York, Jan[uar]y 11, [18]90,” on a 3 ¼” x 4 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a vertical fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SMITH, CALEB BLOOD (1808-1864)

# 6952

U.S. Interior Secretary – 1861-63

Signature, “Caleb B. Smith,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPEED, JAMES (1812-87)

# 6953

U.S. Attorney General – 1864-66

Signed Card, 1 ¼” x 3 ¼”, “James Speed.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with minor bleeding of ink at the conclusion of the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPINNER, FRANCIS E. (1802-90)

# 6954

U.S. Treasurer - 1861-75; U.S. Congressman – New York – 1855-61

Signature, as U.S. Congressman, “F.E. Spinner, M[ember] C[ongress],” on a 1” x 3” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 6955

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

Signature, with the closing in another hand, Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ½” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 7042

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

President Lincoln Appoints Henry Larcom Abott a Brevet Brigadier General

War-Date Document Signed, 8” x 10,” as Secretary of War, Washington, December 2, 1864, “E.M. Stanton,” a partly printed War Department letter informing 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Colonel Henry Larcom Abbott that he has been appointed to the rank of brevet brigadier general by President Lincoln, “…for gallant and distinguished services in the operations before Richmond and especially in the lines before Petersburg,” to rank from August 1, 1864.

A manuscript notation in the lower margin directs this letter through Army of the Potomac Commanding General George G. Meade.

Condition is very good, with light toning and the usual horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

TRUMBULL, LYMAN (1813-96)

# 6977

U.S. Senator - Illinois - 1855-73; Co-authored the Thirteenth Amendment – Prohibiting Slavery in the United States

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, as U.S. Senator from Illinois, Lyman Trumbull, Ill[inois].”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

TYNDALE, HECTOR (1821-80)

# 7038

Union Brigadier General - Pennsylvania; Returned the Body of John Brown for Burial after His Execution

At the request of his Quaker mother, Tyndale turned down an appointment to West Point to enter his father’s ceramics business. He escorted Mrs. John Brown to visit her imprisoned husband on the night before his execution, and on the trip returning his body for burial in North Elba, New York. Twice wounded, having three horses shot from under him, and being left for dead on the field at Antietam, Tynsdale resigned due to poor health on August 26, 1864.

Signature, with the rank Tyndale held from April 9, 1863 until his resignation the following year, “Hector Tyndale, Brig. Genl. U.S. Vol[unteer]s,” on a 1 ¼” x 5 ½” slip of paper; quite possibly war-date, as Tyndale resigned well before the end of the war, and was brevetted major general of volunteers on March 13, 1865.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 6958

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains and a slightly irregular upper edge.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 7051

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ¾” portion of an appointment document.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a vertical crease through the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NewWELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 7826

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69, During the American Civil War

Civil War-Date Letter – Navy Secretary Welles devotes his attention to the Union Blockade

Letter Signed, 7 ¾” x 9 ¾”, with the closing and signature on the reverse, to “James T. Hale, Esq[uire], Washington, D.C.”  Responding to an inquiry from the Pennsylvania congressman, Welles conveys that the foreign fleet has been recalled, understandably preferring to devote all funds and resources available to the U.S. Navy to the Union blockade of the southern states, announced by President Lincoln on April 19, 1861.


“Navy Department, Sept[embe]r 21, 1861.  Sir: Your letter of the 20th inst[ant] has been received.  I have not time to revise the arrangement, at one time proposed with Mr. James McHenry, in regard to funds for our foreign squadrons, referred to by you.  It seems unnecessary, for the arrangement was never consummated by my predecessor, nor has it been recognized, at any time, by this Department.  In addition to this our squadrons have been recalled, rendering any change needless.  I am respectfully. Y[ou]r Obed[ien]t servant, Gideon Welles.”


The paper is lightly and evenly toned, with staining and a few pinholes and light creases in the margins, along with two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 
79 Items.  Showing Items 61 thru 79.
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