Historical Civil War Autographs
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Civil War - The Union

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BARTON, CLARA (1821-1912)

# 6585

American Civil War Nurse; Founder of the American Red Cross

Barton's work in providing medicine and supplies to the wounded on the Civil War front lines earned her the sobriquet "The Angel of the Battlefield.” She went on to found the American Red Cross.

Autograph Letter Signed, 4” x 6 ¼”, undated, responding to an autograph request.

“My dear Mrs. Perkins, I regret that your very small request has been obliged to wait so long for a response, but it affords me great pleasure to be able to comply even at this late date. I write you from my summer resort at 1000 Islands, - & am, Very Sincerely, Clara Barton.”

A fine example in excellent condition.

OUT OF STOCK
 

BLAIR, MONTGOMERY (1813-83)

# 6940

U.S. Postmaster General - 1861-64; Brother of Francis P. Blair, Jr.; Mayor of St. Louis – 1842-43; Counsel for Dred Scott before the U.S. Supreme Court

War-Date Signed Envelope, 3 ¼” x 6”, free-franked as U.S. Postmaster General under President Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, “M. Blair, P.M.G.” The envelope is also addressed by Blair, to “Col[onel] F.A. Dick, St. Louis, Mo.,” and is postmarked “Washington, D.C., May 8, 1863.”

The envelope is lightly toned, with minor wear and a few superficial tears at the edges, along with several small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

BRICE, BENJAMIN W. (1806-92)

# 7220

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel & Paymaster General

Signature, in violet ink, with closing and rank, “Very respectfully & c., B.W. Brice, B[rigadier] Gen[eral] Ret[ire]d,”,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a letter; with a second portion of the same handwritten letter, dated Baltimore, Maryland, May 1, 1876.

OUT OF STOCK
 

BRIGGS, HENRY SHAW (1824-87)

# 6808

Union Brigadier General – Massachusetts

While leading the 10th Massachusetts under McClellan on the Peninsula, Briggs was severely wounded in both thighs at Seven Pines. He briefly returned to active service, to command a brigade in the Middle Department and a division in the Army of the Potomac.

Briggs Writes to His Wife After “the late bloody battle of Gettysburg.”

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, four pages, on a 5” x 8” letter-sheet, signed “your Husband,” incorporating his signature into his wife’s address, “Mrs. H.S. Briggs, Pittsfield, Mass[achusetts],” at the conclusion. Assigned to lead an Eighth Corps brigade in the Army of the Potomac, Briggs relates the rigors sustained by the troops in his command. Many of them were Massachusetts Volunteers approaching the end of their nine-month terms of service – diverted and quick-marched to guard Union-held territory near Harpers Ferry during the retreat of Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia after “the late bloody battle of Gettysburg.”


“In camp near Hamilton or ‘Harmony Church,’ Loudon Co[unty], V[irgini]a, Sunday Evening, July 19, 1863.

Dear Molly,

I have been thinking ever since we got into camp about 11 o’clock this forenoon that I must write; but it has been so hot and I have been so sleepy that I have not got to it till now (past 9 o’c[lock] eve) and that is time to turn in for…as early as 4 o’c[lock] in the morning to march.

This has been the hottest day we have had, and the men could hardly have endured a long march. We left camp near Waterford this morning at about 7 o’c[lock] and halted here as I said a little before 11 o’c[lock]. We are bivouacked in a fine wood, the first shade of any account we have had in our encampment. I last wrote you at camp near Buckittsville on Thursday I believe (or Friday, it is very difficult for me to keep the days of the week). We were ordered to march from there at 4 o’c[lock] yesterday morning but didn’t get off till about 6, then marched to Waterford which we reached about 2 o’c[lock] and had plenty of time to get into camp and rest before night. We crossed the Potomac yesterday morning by a pontoon bridge about 8 o’c[lock] at Berlin, where we left the 46[th] Mass[achusetts] Col[onel] [William S.] Shurtleff to go home its time having nearly expired. That leaves me with only the 8th [Massachusetts] whose time expires on the 30th inst[ant] and the 39th [Massachusetts] about a thousand men in all; But that is a large Brigade in this Corps so reduced has it become by the casualties of a long term, the most ever of all which was the late bloody battle of Gettysburg. A Vermont Brig[age] left the Div[ision] yesterday also nine month troops.

Which way we go from here I know nothing of nor what is going on about us. It was supposed this morning that we were going to Leesburg [Virginia] from which we were about 7 miles to the north. We are now about the same distance west, and about mid-way between or opposite Gregors and Snickers Gaps in the Blue Ridge. I keep remarkably well altho[ugh] we all feel our broken sleep. Our orders to march almost invariably come after midnight here since there is not much sleep for us after that.

Dear Molly I have thought a great deal of you all to day, both on the march and since arrival in camp. I can think of you with better heart than when I first joined this army a week ago tho[ugh] not less tenderly and graciously. I am not so homesick and have come to accept my position as a necessity and duty. I am not altogether agreeably situated here; but I am content for the present in the belief that there will be some change soon as my command will be broken up by the departure of the 8th [Massachusetts] a week hence.

It is now a fortnight since the date of your and George’s last letter. I do not allow myself to be anxious about you, trusting the Father of Mercies and of us all to keep you. Our mails are not often sent, since I suppose it is hardly known at Washington what my address is. I shall hope now to hear from you after the receipt of my letter from Funkstown dated a week ago tomorrow.

Our mail boy was sent to H[ea]d Qu[arter]s tonight but returned with the message that probably there would be no mail sent for two or three days.

I must turn in. So good night with lots of love to all. Affectionately your Husband. Mrs. H.S. Briggs, Pittsfield, Mass[achusetts].”


Overall condition is excellent, with the usual light toning and two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

BUELL, DON CARLOS (1818-98)

# 6699

Union Major General - Ohio

Buell was instrumental in the Federal victories at Ft. Donelson and Shiloh, where his arrival late in the first day saved Grant from the Confederate attack. He was replaced by Rosecrans due to his hesitance in the pursuit of Bragg after the October 1862 battle of Perryville.

Signature, “D.C. Buell, Airdrie, Dec[ember] 28, 1886,” on a 2 ¼” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

BUTLER, BENJAMIN F. (1818-93)

# 6960

Union Major General – Massachusetts; Republican U.S. Congressman – Massachusetts – 1867-75 & 1877-79; U.S. Presidential Candidate – Greenback Party - 1884

Known as “Beast Butler” for his harsh treatment of civilians in New Orleans, Butler had, ironically, nominated Jefferson Davis for the presidency on the 1860 Democratic ticket.

War-Date Signature, “Yours truly, Benj. F. Butler, Maj. Genl. Com[manding],” on a 2 ½” x 4 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a horizontal fold, along with minor bleeding of ink in portions of Butler’s rank.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CAMERON, SIMON (1799-1889)

# 6941

U.S. Secretary of War - 1861-62

As a contender for the Republican nomination for the presidency in 1860, Cameron threw his support to Lincoln when promised a cabinet seat. His brief tenure as Secretary of War was so marked by corruption that he was forced to resign in 1862.

Signature, “Simon Cameron,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a small tear at the upper edge, well away from the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CARR, JOSEPH B. (1828-95)

# 6961

Union Brigadier General - New York

A colonel of New York militia when the Civil War broke out, Carr led the 2nd New York Infantry at Big Bethel, commanded a brigade at the Peninsula and Second Manassas, and saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. Afterward, he was assigned command of a division of Black troops in Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James, the unit serving in the Union defenses on the York and James Rivers.

Signed Card, with rank, "J.B. Carr, B[revet] Major Genl. U.S. V[olunteers].”

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHAMBERLAIN, JOSHUA L. (1828-1914)

# 7037

Union Brigadier General – Maine; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for Gettysburg

As colonel of the 20th Maine, Chamberlain gallantly defended Little Round Top, preventing a Confederate victory at Gettysburg.

Document Signed, 9 ¼” x 11 ½”, January 27, 1892, “Joshua L. Chamberlain,” as President of the Ocala and Silver Springs Company, a partly printed stock certificate for five shares to one James E. Simpson.  Countersigned by the company treasurer.

Illustrated in two views due to scanner limitations, the document is pleasantly age-toned, with several folds and light creases.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHAMBERLAIN, JOSHUA L. (1828-1914)

# 7036

Union Brigadier General – Maine; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for Gettysburg

As colonel of the 20th Maine, Chamberlain gallantly defended Little Round Top, preventing a Confederate victory at Gettysburg.

Civil War-Date Signature, a seldom-seen example with sentiment and the rank Chamberlain held from June 18, 1864 through the end of the war, on a 1 ¾” x 5” slip of lined paper. Chamberlain was brevetted major general of volunteers on March 29, 1865.

“Very respectfully, Your ob[e]d[ien]t Serv[an]t, J.L. Chamberlain, Brig. Genl. Com[man]d[in]g.”

The slip is lightly toned, with some show-through of old glue staining on the reverse, and there is a small hole above the “Com” in Chamberlain’s rank; illustrated against a black background for added clarity.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 6942

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war, and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

Inscribed Signature, as antebellum Governor of Ohio, “For Geo[rge] M. Fowler, Esq[uire]. I have the honor to be Very respectfully Yours & c., S.P. Chase, Columbus, Ap[ri]l 24, 1857,” on a 5” x 7” sheet of embossed stationery. A period engraved image, cut into an oval shape, has been affixed to the upper right corner.

The sheet has light soiling and wear, along with the expected folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CHASE, SALMON P. (1808-73)

# 7045

U.S. Treasury Secretary - 1861-64; U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice - 1864-73

As Lincoln’s Treasury Secretary, Chase was instrumental in the efforts to finance the war and was responsible for the issue and acceptance of paper money as legal tender. Continued rivalry and strife with Lincoln precipitated his appointment to fill the Supreme Court vacancy created by the death of Roger B. Taney in 1864.

War-Date Signature, with closing and title in another hand, “S.P. Chase,” on a 1 ½” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a letter as U.S. Treasury Secretary, the position Chase held from March 4, 1861 through December 6, 1864; with the pencil notation, “1862” in the lower margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

CORNING, ERASTUS (1794-1872)

# 5338

American Industrialist – New York Central Railroad Founder; Democratic U.S. Congressman – 1857-59 & 1861-63

Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 8”, as U.S. Congressman from New York, responding to a request for the appointment of the former U.S. Minister to Ecuador, Van Brugh Livingston, from William W. Campbell, a prominent New York judge and former member of the U.S. House of Representatives, and promising to pursue the matter directly to President James Buchanan.

“Washington, Dec. 18, 1858. W.W. Campbell, Esq., My dear Sir, I duly rec[eive]d your favor of the 25th ult[imo] requesting my aid in obtaining the appointment of Doct[or] Livingston as consul at La Union San Salvador. I have seen the Dep[ut]y Sec[retar]y of State who will advance to the President to make the appointment. I hope to see the President on Monday when I trust I shall be able to bring the matter to a point. Yours Very Respectfully, Erastus Corning.”

Several light folds and a light diagonal crease at lower left, well away from text.

Price: $275.00
Quantity: 
 

CUSTER, ELIZABETH B. (1842-1933)

# 6784

Wife of 7th Cavalry Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer; Author of Numerous Books on Her Husband and the American West

Mrs. Custer Asks for an Application to Join the Daughters of the American Revolution

Autograph Letter Signed, 1 ½ pages, on two separate 5” x 6 ½” sheets. Well into her eighties, Mrs. Custer writes to obtain an application to join the Daughters of the American Revolution.

71 Park Avenue, N.Y., August 28 [1927]. Miss Blanche Edwards, My dear Miss Edwards, My cousin Mrs. Bingham has long wanted me to be a Daughter of the American Revolution and has been so good as to make it possible by searching records. I shall be glad to have the blanks for application when it is convenient for you to send them. Thanking you in advance I am very sincerely yours, Elizabeth B. Custer.”

Both sheets have a horizontal fold at the center and heavier toning along the edges. The accompanying transmittal envelope, 3 ½” x 5 ¼”, addressed by Mrs. Custer, to “Miss Blanche Edwards, Abiline, Kansas,” has general soiling and wear, along with a tear at the upper edge, near the August 29, 1927, Grand Central Station, New York postmark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

DENNISON, WILLIAM (1815-82)

# 6943

U.S. Postmaster General – 1864-66; Governor of Ohio – 1860-62

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ¼”, “W. Dennison,” with the notation “Post Master General, Feb. 10th 1866in another hand beneath.

Lightly and evenly toned, with mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

DEVIN, THOMAS C. (1822-78)

# 6963

Union Brigadier General – New York

Born in New York City to immigrant Irish parents, Devin served as colonel of the 6th New York Cavalry from the unit’s formation in late 1861 through the battles of Antietam and Fredericksburg. He led a cavalry brigade under Union General John Buford in the first day’s fighting at Gettysburg, and subsequently saw action in Kilpatrick’s raid on Richmond and with Sheridan in the Shenandoah.

War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a 2 ¼” x 3 ½” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

“Head Q[uar]t[e]rs, 2nd Brig[ade] 1st Cav[alry] Division, Oct. 23, 1863. Approved & Respectfully forwarded. Thos. C. Devin, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g Brig[ade].”

OUT OF STOCK
 

DOUBLEDAY, ABNER (1819-93)

# 7028

Union Major General  – New York

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Doubleday was garrisoned in Charleston Harbor when the Civil War began with the bombardment of Ft. Sumter by forces under Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard. He subsequently saw action at Second Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, where he assumed command of the First Corps upon the death of John Reynolds. Doubleday has since been popularly credited with inventing baseball.

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, on a lightly toned sheet, trimmed to 5” x 6”. Near the conclusion of the war’s third year, Doubleday sends this handwritten letter for the collection of noted autograph collector William H. Fry. Accompanying records indicate that Fry’s collection, this piece included as Lot #580, was sold by Davis & Harvey, a Philadelphia auction company, on June 7 & 8, 1907.

“Washington, D.C., Dec[ember] 13, 1863. Sir, I enclose my autograph as requested. A. Doubleday, Major Genl. Vol[unteers]. To Wm. H. Fry, Esq., Harrisburg, P[ennsylvani]a.”

There are two horizontal folds, and a small hole near the right edge affects one letter of text.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EADS, JAMES B. (1820-87)

# 5225

American River Engineer & Inventor

Eads made enormous contribution to the Union cause by developing and manufacturing the iron-clad gunboats which helped in the opening of the Mississippi and other western rivers. 

Autograph Note Signed, 5” x 5”, inscribed to, and crediting, prominent Republican U.S. Senator Angus Cameron of Wisconsin for political assistance rendered in Eads’ effort to open the mouth of the Mississippi River below New Orleans to permanent navigation by installing jetties to scour sedimentation from the riverbed. Begun in 1875, entirely at his own risk - Eads would receive no payment from the government until a twenty-foot channel depth was achieved – the $5 million project was completed five years later, during which time New Orleans shipping tonnage rose by sixty-five times, making it the second largest port in the United States.

“Presented to the Honorable Angus Cameron, one of the Statesmen to whom the Mississippi Valley is indebted for an open mouth to its great river. From his friend Jas. B. Eads.”

Slightly heavier toning along right edge.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ELLSWORTH, EPHRAIM ELMER (1837-61)

# 7024

Union Colonel – Raised the 11th New York Infantry – “Ellsworth’s Fire Zouaves”

A personal friend of President Lincoln, Ellsworth became an instant hero to the Union when he was shot by proprietor James T. Jackson while removing the Confederate flag from the Marshall House Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia on May 24, 1861. Jackson was, in turn, immediately shot and killed by Zouave Private Francis E. Brownell, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the action.

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with initials, "E.E.E.,” on the reverse of a Terpsichorean Club card of the U.S. Zouave Cadets, probably relating to a formal dance sponsored by the unit.

The card is accompanied by a printed forty-page booklet, 3 ½” x 5 ¼”, enumerating the terms of drill and many other details of the Zouaves’ history and of their “Proposed Tour of the United States.” Strictly drilled and held to the most rigorous standards of military and personal discipline, their gaudy uniforms fashioned after those of the French colonial troops in Algeria, the unit achieved national renown as an exhibition while touring the northeastern United States.

The text of the back cover, Chicago, Ill., Sept, 20th 1859,” along with several pages of press notices dating from mid 1859 through May 1860, associate the booklet and card to Ellsworth’s time in Illinois, where he trained the Chicago National Guard Cadets, later known as the U.S. Zouave Cadets. Having studied in the law office of Abraham Lincoln during his time in Illinois, Ellsworth became a personal friend of the Lincoln family. He campaigned tirelessly for Lincoln in the election of 1860, and accompanied the new President to Washington, D.C. for the inauguration.

Both pieces bear general soiling and wear; having heavier staining on the covers, the booklet contains all its original pages, legible and unmarred.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6860

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Signed Card, 2” x 4 ¼”, “Edward Everett.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a few stains, and there is glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6995

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Autograph Letter Signed, 6 ½” x 8”, to “Mrs. J.L. Payson.” From his home in Boston, Everett amusingly responds to a request for autographs, presumably those of Rufus Choate, Thomas Hart Benton, and Washington Irving – no longer present with this letter.

“Summer Street, 23 Nov[ember] 1854. Dear Mrs. Payson, After my former note was written, it occurred to me to send you the autographs of Mr. Choate, and Col. Benton, in addition to that of Mr. Irving; a group certainly of which the members have nothing in common, but that they are all celebrities. With the greatest Regard, Sincerely Yours, Edward Everett.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the expected folds. There are two tears, with no loss of paper, in the lower left corner, along with damp-staining along the right margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FESSENDEN, WILLIAM P. (1806-69)

# 6944

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1864-65; U.S. Senator – Maine – 1854-69

Signature, as U.S. Senator, “W.P. Fessenden, U[nited] S[tates] S[enate],” on a 1” x 3” slip paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FOOTE, ANDREW H. (1806-1863)

# 6852

Union Rear Admiral

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)  U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69


As commodore in the U.S. Navy, Foote provided naval support in the Federal operations against Forts Henry and Donelson and in the bombardment of Island #10. Promoted to rear admiral for those actions, he died shortly after being transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 1863.

As the Country Prepares for War - Just a Month Before the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter - a Union Sailor is Detached to Await Orders

Endorsement Signed, “Forwarded by A.H. Foote…March 11/[18]61,” on the reverse of the attached leaf of a Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, by Navy Secretary Gideon Welles. In an action undoubtedly replicated throughout the military, emblematic of the nation’s preparation for the Civil War that would break out just a month later, Welles orders “3rd Ass[istan]t Engineer Oscar H. Lackey, U.S. Navy, New York,” detached from his prior assignment aboard the Crusader, to await further orders:

“Navy Department, 9 March 1861. Sir, You are hereby detached from the Crusader and you will regard yourself as Waiting Orders. I am, respectfully, Your Obed[ien]t Serv[an]t, Gideon Welles...”

The letter-sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with an old clip hole in the upper margin. The integral leaf signed by Foote bears heavier soiling and wear, and contains an extremely detailed Navy Department watermark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GARFIELD, JAMES A. (1831-81)

# 6684

Twentieth U.S. President – 1881; Union Major General - Ohio

Signed Photograph, 2 ¼” x 4”, “J.A. Garfield, Ohio,a Brady carte-de-visite.

There is light soiling and wear, and the upper corners of the card have been trimmed diagonally. The ornate back-mark has been marred by past mounting.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GATES, THEODORE B. (1825-1911)

# 7231

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Lieutenant Colonel – 20th New York State Militia; Union Colonel – 80th New York Infantry

War-Date Autograph Endorsement Signed, on a 2 ¼” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a larger document. “H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 20th N.Y. S[tate] M[ilitia], Brookes Station, Va., May 11, 1863. Respectfully forwarded & cordially recommended, Theodore B. Gates, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

GEARY, JOHN W. (1819-1873)

# 7022

Union Brigadier General – Pennsylvania; First Mayor of San Francisco, California – 1850-51; Governor of Kansas Territory – 1856-57; Governor of Pennsylvania – 1867-73

A veteran of the Mexican War, Geary began the Civil War as Colonel of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was twice wounded at Cedar Mountain, commanded the 2nd Division of the 12th Corps at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and subsequently saw action at Chattanooga. After the war, Geary served two terms as Governor of Pennsylvania.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “Jno. W. Geary, Brig. Genl. Com[man]d[in]g,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a larger document or letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains, along with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GRANT, ULYSSES S. (1822-85)

# 7027

18th U.S. President - 1869-77; Union Lieutenant General

From Vicksburg, Grant Exerts His Authority Over the Mississippi, in an Incident with the Steamer Empress – Later Burned by Nathan Bedford Forrest

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 1 ½ pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded 5” x 8” letter-sheet, to a United States Treasury agent identified only as “Mr. Montrose.”

From his headquarters in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Confederate river stronghold having fallen to Federal forces under Grant just three months earlier, the Union commander informs Agent Montrose of the improper seizure of a cotton-laden steamer on the river by the U.S. Navy. As unhindered shipping on the Mississippi had resumed after the mid-summer fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, Montrose is further instructed to provide passes for use by Union vessels as additional protection against future seizures in violation of orders already issued by Grant.


“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs Dep[artmen]t of the Ten[nessee], Vicksburg, Miss[issippi], Oct[ober] 6th 1863. Mr. Montrose, Ag[en]t Treas[ury] Dept. Sir, The gentlemen with Gen[eral] Stewart, the bearer of this, have all shipped Cotton on the Steamer Empress, from Natchez, Miss[issippi] in conformity with Gen[eral] Orders No. 57, current series and were stopped at the mouth of the Red river by the Navy. I have written to the Naval Commander at that place, enclosing a copy of the order referred to and presume with this the Empress will be permitted to pass. However for further security I have to request that you issue Treasury passes in addition to the Authority already granted. Yours truly, U.S. Grant, Maj[or] Gen[eral].”
Three passages from the Official Records, communications between the U.S. Navy vessels involved, provide further details of the controversy, in part:

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, October 4, 1863. Sir: This morning the steamer Empress came down from Natchez, having on board about 2,800 bales of cotton, taken on board by permission of Brigadier-General M.M. Crocker, commanding U.S. forces at Natchez…Never having received orders to pass cotton shipped by permission of army officers, and the proclamation of the President of March 31, 1863, and the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury of the same date not permitting any such trade, I ordered the captain of the Empress to return to Natchez with the cotton, and gave him a letter to General Crocker, a copy of which I enclose. I was informed by the captain of the Empress that these permits were given by General Grant…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding Third District.”

“U.S.S. Benton, Off Natchez, October 9, 1863…I was informed by my executive officer that he had forwarded a letter from General Grant to Captain Ramsay, a copy of which I send, in which the general was willing to assume the responsibility in the premises and referred to an order from the Treasury Department of September 15, 1863, which caused him to issue his General Order No. 57, which I send enclosed…Jas. A. Greer, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 4th Dist., Miss. Squadron.”

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, November 8, 1863. Captain Couthouy told them that you commanded the Mississippi River; that General Grant was absolute on shore, but that he did not control so much of the water of the Mississippi as would be sufficient for him to wash his face in; that this was no question between military and naval authority, but simply whether the officers in command of gunboats should obey your orders and those of the Secretary of the Navy or those of General Grant…A person calling himself General David Stewart (who, I was informed in Natchez, is supposed to be a cotton speculator) took it upon himself to spread a number of reports, and was the principal speaker among the passengers on the Empress…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 3rd Dist., Miss. Squadron.”


While Navy officers were still embroiled in the controversy back on the Mississippi, Grant was en route to Chattanooga just two weeks after the date of this letter to Agent Montrose, in command of the new Military Division of the Mississippi, setting the stage for the battles of Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge. Interestingly, it was later reported that the Empress was burned by Confederate cavalry forces under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Island #34 on October 28, 1864.

There is light, even toning, with the usual folds, several small stains, and somewhat heavier soiling and wear to the docketed fourth page of the letter-sheet. Slight trimming of the margins, perhaps inadvertent when the envelope in which the letter was delivered was opened, affects several letters of text in the last line of the first page and in the first word of the second.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GRANT, ULYSSES S. (1822-85)

# 7148

18th U.S. President - 1869-77; Union Lieutenant General

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ½”, “U.S. Grant.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a barely noticeable one-eighth inch tear at the right edge and old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 6945

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signature, “H. Hamlin, Maine,” on a 2 ¾” x 4 ¾” portion of a lightly toned album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 7001

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¼”, with a full signature, Hannibal Hamlin, Bangor, Ap[ri]l 18, 1891,” from Hamlin’s home in Maine, less than three months before his death.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMMOND, JOHN (1827-89)

# 7236

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 5th New York Cavalry; U.S. Congressman – New York - 1879-83

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed – as Major of the Fifth New York Cavalry

War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a lightly toned 2 ¼” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 5th N.Y. Cavalry, n[ea]r Hartwood Ch[urch, Va., Sept[ember] 6, 1863. Approved recommended and respectfully forwarded. J. Hammond, Major Com[man]d[in]g.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6880

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4 ¼”, “John Hay.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6946

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois, and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4”, “John Hay.”

Pristine, both front and reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6714

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, on the first and third leaves of a 5 ¼” x 8” letter-sheet. Addressing former Union General Frederick Tracy Dent, brother-in-law and secretary of President Ulysses S. Grant, Hay seeks the help of the President in securing his brother’s advancement in the military.

New York, August 31 [no year]. My Dear General Dent, Enclosed you will find the note to the President which you suggested I should write. My brother Lieutenant Leonard Hay is Adjutant of the 9th Infantry. He likes the service and desires to remain in it. I know him to be a very efficient and valuable officer and if you can do anything to promote his wishes, I am sure it will be to the advantage of the service, and will lay me under great personal obligations. I am very faithfully yours, John Hay. P.S. My address will be for the present ‘Republican Office, Chicago’ where I am always at your disposition.”

Beneath Hay’s closing and signature, General Dent has written and initialed a biographical notation of Hay, in pencil, “Private Sec[retary] of President Lincoln and author of Jim Beldsoe & little breeches. F.T.D.”

The letter-sheet bears the usual light toning, and there is weakness and clean separation, with no loss of paper, at the edges of two horizontal folds. The text of the letter is unaffected by a three-quarter inch area of paper loss in the upper margin of the second page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 6859

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Signature, with date and sentiment, “…1st Sept[ember] 1867. Sincerely, R.B. Hayes,” on a 5” x 5 ½” sheet of lined paper, for “Wm. A. Baker, Auburn, N.Y.

The sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with minor show-through from old glue staining on the reverse, and there are two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 7554

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¾”, with a desirable full signature, “Rutherford B. Hayes.” On the reverse is the notation “2-28-[18]91, R.B. Hayes,” presumably in the hand of the collector who obtained the autograph.

The card is lightly and evenly toned, and there are old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 7654

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Governor of Ohio – 1868-72 & 1876-77; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Document Signed, 7 ¾” x 10”, as U.S. President, a partly printed “affix the seal” document.


“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a Warrant for the pardon of John B. Martin, dated this day and signed by me; and for so doing this shall be his warrant. R.B. Hayes. Washington, 9th Aug[u]st, 1877.”
In excellent condition overall, the document is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds.

Price: $550.00
Quantity: 
 

HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL, JR. (1841-1935)

# 6786

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice– 1902-32; Civil War Union Captain – 20th Massachusetts Infantry

Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 6 ½”, to “Mrs. Carl C. Wheaton.” As U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, Holmes cordially complies with an autograph request, signing in full at the conclusion.

Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, September 5, 1930. My dear Mrs. Wheaton, Presence here will prevent my accepting your kind offer to show me your autograph book, but it gives me pleasure to comply with your slight request that I add to it and join so distinguished a company. Very Truly Yours, Oliver Wendell Holmes.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few unobtrusive stains and a horizontal fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HUNTER, MORTON C. (1825-96)

# 7240

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 82nd Indiana Infantry

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from Indiana, “Morton C. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana,” on a 2 ½” x 6” portion of an album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LEE, SAMUEL P. (1812-97)

# 6870

Union Rear Admiral

A distant cousin of Robert E. Lee, Samuel P. Lee remained loyal to the Union when war erupted in 1861. He commanded numerous ships during the course of the war, most notably on blockade duty, from which he received more than $100,000 in prize money for the capture of Confederate blockade runners.

Letter Signed, 8” x 13 ½”. As commander of the North Atlantic Fleet in Key West, Florida, Lee directs Commodore Joseph F. Green in the use of coal for U.S. Navy vessels at St. Thomas, due to the expiration of a contract for its receipt and storage.

“U.S.S. Severn (2nd Rate), Key West, Fl[orid]a, February 13th 1871. Commodore Joseph F. Green, U.S.A., Commander of Squadron, North Atlantic Fleet, or Senior Naval Officer in Dominican Waters. Sir, The Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting under date of January 24th 1871 informs me that as it intends to discontinue its contract with Mrs. Johanna Gordon, from and after the 24th June next, (the date of its expiration) for the receiving, storing &c. of the Government coal at St. Thomas, it is desirable that the stock of Coal on hand (263 tons) as per report of 25 Dec[ember] 1870, should be used up before the expiration of the contract. Please therefore give such directions to cruisers under your command, as will accomplish this object. When the stock of Coal on hand has been used up, Coal may be bought at ‘St. Thomas,’ to the best interests of the Government, whenever required by cruisers touching at that port. Respectfully Yours, S.P.Lee, Rear Admiral Com[mandin]g N[orth] A[tlantic] Fleet.”

The letter has three horizontal folds, and there is a diagonal break, with no loss of paper, at center left. A strip of old paper backing along the left edge is still present.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6379

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

A Request for a Lieutenant’s Promotion – Just Two Months Before He was Mortally Wounded at Cedar Creek

Civil War-Date Autograph Note Signed, as President on a 5” x 8” sheet of Executive Mansion stationery, beneath a request from F.H. Baldwin for the promotion of his brother, a lieutenant in the 5th U.S. Artillery.

“The above, written by a very good man, is submitted to the Secretary of War. A. Lincoln.”

Noted as a resident of Allentown, Pennsylvania in the accompanying National Archives records, Mr. Baldwin was undoubtedly a caller at the Executive Mansion, and was directed to write his request, hoping that President Lincoln would approve and advance it through the proper channels. His letter, accomplished in pencil, in full:

Aug. 12th 1864. To His Excellency, Abraham Lincoln, President of the U.S. I desire the transfer or promotion of my brother, Lt. Henry M. Baldwin, Battery M, 5th Reg[imen]t U.S. Artillery, to any vacancy in the Regt. which you may decide it possible to place him, consistent with the good of the service. Very Resp[ectfull]y, F.H. Baldwin.”

There is no record of Lieutenant Baldwin’s promotion or transfer before he was severely wounded through the chest and left arm on October 19, 1864 – just two months later - at the Battle of Cedar Creek. He died on November 8, 1864 at Sheridan Hospital, near Winchester, Virginia.

The letter is in excellent condition, with creases from two vertical folds.                                                                                      

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6678

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Document Signed, 15” x 19”, as President, Washington, July 29, 1861, “Abraham Lincoln,” a partly printed appointment for “…Stephen Brooks…Surveyor of the Customs for the District of Middletown in the State of Connecticut.” Countersigned by the Secretary of the Treasury, “S.P. Chase.”

The document is in excellent overall condition, with light age toning and several minor paper breaks at the intersections of the usual folds. Both signatures are distinct and free from flaw in every respect.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LINCOLN, ABRAHAM (1809-65)

# 6679

Sixteenth U.S. President - 1861-65

Civil War-Date Franked Envelope, 3” x 5 ¼”, as President, “A. Lincoln.” The envelope is also addressed by Lincoln, to “Rev[erend] Z.P. Wilds, 120 Prince Street, New York,” and has a June 21, 1862, Washington postmark.

The previous day, Lincoln met with a six-member delegation of Progressive Friends, composed of Thomas Garrett, Alice Eliza Hambleton, Oliver Johnson, Dinah Mendenhall, William Barnard, and Eliza Agnew. The group presented the President with a memorial, urging him to decree the emancipation of the slaves, the position adopted at the Friends’ annual meeting. It is quite worthy of note that Lincoln wrote Reverend Wilds, well known as a longtime missionary to the poor of New York City, the day following his meeting with this group of prominent leaders in the Abolition and Underground Railroad movements.

Set into an attractive, inlaid pedestal frame, the envelope bears general soiling and wear, along with minor paper loss along the right edge and above the somewhat smudged postmark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MacDOUGALL, CLINTON D. (1839-1914)

# 7246

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Captain – 75th New York Infantry; Union Colonel – 111th New York Infantry; U.S. Congressman – New York – 1873-77

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from New York, “C.D. MacDougall, Auburn, N.Y.,” on a lightly toned 2 ½” x 5 ¼” portion of an album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MARSTON, GILMAN (1811-90)

# 6835

Union Brigadier General - New Hampshire; U.S. Congressman – New Hampshire – 1859-63 & 1865-67; U.S. Senator – New Hampshire - 1889

Marston recruited and led the 2nd New Hampshire at First Bull Run, the Peninsula, and Fredericksburg. After Gettysburg, he was assigned to establish the prison camp at Point Lookout and returned to the Army of the Potomac for the disastrous Union assault at Cold Harbor.

Marston Writes of the Hard Fighting at Drewry’s Bluff

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, three pages, on a 5” x 8” letter-sheet. Writing to an unnamed cousin from the scene of the Union’s just-concluded attempt to take Richmond, Marston shares details of the hard fighting, and concludes with information relating to political events in his native New Hampshire. In the campaign which came to be known as Drewry’s Bluff, begun on May 6, 1864, Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James advanced overland toward Richmond from the Bermuda Hundred, just north of City Point. As indicated in this letter, the Federal Army came within six miles of the Confederate capital before being repulsed in a counterattack by troops under P.G.T. Beauregard on May 16, successfully delaying the fall of Richmond by almost a year.


“In the Field near Drewry’s Bluff, May 19, [18]64.

Friend Cousin,

Your brother in [?] wrote me to know what had become of you, but I suppose you have reported before this as Wilkinson tells me you started for home some days ago. Since I started on this campaign I have had little opportunity to hear from or write to anyone. For nearly a week I had no opportunity of sending letters if I had the time to write them. It has been the hardest kind of campaigning I have ever known. Marching, fighting, sleeping on the ground without tents, fire or even a blanket. I have several times undertaken to write a short note but before I could complete it everybody would be called to arms to repel a charge or make an attack. I have had to write orders and reports with a tree for a table while shot and shells were crashing through the branches. The rebels are pressing us about as hard as we are pressing them and last night they shelled our camps. But I imagine we shall soon reverse all this and drive them within their earthen walls about Richmond and force an entrance ourselves. The right wing of the army got within 6 or 7 miles of Richmond on the 16th but that 6 or 7 miles we shall find a much harder road to travel than that we have passed over. I have re[ceive]d only three or four letters from N.H. since I left Yorktown and not one from Washington. Probably people don’t know where I am and I hardly know myself. That it is all woods, swamps & ravines with but very little land in cultivation I know very well.

What new thing has turned up about the Senatorship – anything? Wilkinson had a letter from his brother saying Tuck was about played out & that Rollins he thought was gaining a little. I am told also that the Boston Advertiser is down on me for not supporting Joel and us not being in the front rank of republicans &c &c. That is Tuck of course. His hand may not have written the article but his mean spirit dictated it. Well, we have had to deal with these fellows before and whatever else they may do they cannot defeat us.

I should like for you to write me and let me know the present aspect of affairs.

When I will get time to write again I don’t know. My command occupies me every moment.

Yours very truly, G. Marston.

Remember me kindly to friend Gale.”


The sheets are lightly and evenly toned, with the usual horizontal folds, and there is light water staining throughout.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCLELLAN, MARY ELLEN MARCY (1836-1915)

# 5797

Wife of Union General George B. McClellan; Daughter of Union General Randolph B. Marcy

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on separate sheets of a folded 3 ½” x 5 ½” embossed personal letter-sheet, responding to a request for her husband’s autograph. 

“Mr. Renshaw – I regret that I have no note of Genl. McClellan’s that I can give away – and when asked for his autographs am obliged to send merely his signature. If this will afford you any gratification I am very happy to enclose it to you. Yours & c, M.E. McClellan. New York City, May 19th/[18]62.”

At the time, General McClellan had completed his tentative advance up the York-James Peninsula to threaten Richmond, and he had written to his wife frequently during the month-long campaign. The letters which Mrs. McClellan was unwilling to part with would have undoubtedly contained significant insight into both the movement of the Army of the Potomac and her husband’s frustration at the continuous urging of President Lincoln for more aggressive action against the outnumbered Confederate defenders.

Lightly and evenly toned, with several light folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCULLOCH, HUGH (1808-95)

# 6949

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1865-69 & 1884-85

Signature, “Hugh McCulloch,” on a 2 ¼” x 4” slip of paper. A small image is affixed to the lower left corner; the signature is, in turn, mounted to a 5 ½” x 8 ½” album page, with the notation, “Secretary of the Treasury 1867,” in another hand above.

The signed slip is lightly and evenly toned. The larger album page has several chips and binding holes along the left edge, along with two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McPHERSON, JAMES B. (1828-64)

# 6887

Union Major General - Ohio

An 1853 graduate of West Point, McPherson entered the war as first lieutenant of engineers, seeing action at Forts Henry & Donelson, Shiloh, and Corinth. As major general of volunteers, he commanded the 17th Corps through the Vicksburg Campaign, winning the praise of both Grant and Sherman. McPherson was killed-in-action on July 22,1864, during Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “Jas. B. McPherson, Maj. Genl.” on a 1 ½” x 3 ¾” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MEDILL, JOSEPH (1823-99)

# 7064

Canadian-Born Journalist; Editor of the Chicago Tribune; Mayor of Chicago – 1871-73

As influential editor of the Chicago Tribune, Medill was instrumental in the nomination of Abraham Lincoln for the presidency, and remained his staunch supporter throughout the Civil War. He served one term in office as mayor of Chicago, from 1871 to 1873.

Document Signed, Chicago, Illinois, June 25, 1873, “J. Medill,” as Chicago mayor, a partly printed 3 ¼” x 7 ½” check, payable to “S.Y. Prince” for $1.48 and drawn on the Chicago Police Fund.

There are a few pinholes along the left edge, which has been trimmed slightly, and there is a small area of paper loss in the lower left corner. The signature is unaffected by a punch cancellation at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

NICOLAY, JOHN G. (1832-1901)

# 6950

Private Secretary of Abraham Lincoln

A prominent Illinois newspaper editor, Nicolay served as Lincoln’s private secretary from 1860 through the end of the Civil War. After the war, he served as U.S. consul in Paris and marshal of the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1890, he and John Hay published their ten-volume biography of Lincoln.

Signed Card, 1 ¾” x 4”, “Jno. G. Nicolay.”

The card has light toning and soiling.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PACKARD, JASPER (1832-99)

# 7256

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 128th Indiana Infantry; U.S. Congressman – Indiana – 1869-75

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from Indiana, “Jasper Packard, LaPorte, Ind.,” on a 2 ¼” x 5 ¼” portion of an album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

PORTER, WILLIAM D. (1809-64)

# 5854

Union Commodore

A lifelong navy man, born in New Orleans, Porter commanded Union naval forces at Ft. Henry, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, and Baton Rouge. He held no active command after promotion to commodore and died on May 1, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with sentiment and the rank Porter held from July 15, 1862 until his death during the Civil War, “Yours Respectfully, W.D. Porter, Commodore, U.S. N[avy],” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting traces on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

RICE, JAMES C. (1829-64)

# 6610

Union Brigadier General - New York; Mortally Wounded at the Battle of Spotsylvania

After early-war service with the 39th New York, Rice led the 44th New York in the Peninsula campaign and at Second Manassas, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, where his heroic defense of Little Round Top secured his promotion to brigadier. He was severely wounded while leading a brigade in Wadsworth's division at Spotsylvania and died from complications arising from the amputation of his leg.

Revealing a Movement of the Army of the Potomac to a Newspaperman!

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 7 ¾”. Writing on the day after Abraham Lincoln’s delivery of the Gettysburg Address, Rice orders a newspaper subscription and seeks the unknown recipient’s opinion of his report of the Battle of Gettysburg. For the presumed purpose of illustrating his importance as a correspondent, Rice further offers to submit letters for publication during the upcoming winter, astonishingly suggesting an imminent movement of the Army of the Potomac.

“Army of the Potomac, H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 2nd Brig. 1st Div. 1st Corps, November 20th 1863. My dear Sir, I should be happy to have the Semi Weekly Post sent to my address. Whenever I have a safe opportunity, I will send you the amount of the annual subscription. Have you ever found time to look over my report of the battle of Gettysburgh? I hope during the coming winter to write a few letters for the Post. There are indications of the movement of this army in a day or two. Be so kind as to write me a few lines. Very sincerely Yours, J.C. Rice, Brig. Genl.”

Throughout the war, President Lincoln and the Union high command were routinely vexed by the reporting of troop movements in newspapers which could be readily obtained by Confederate sympathizers and spies. It is astounding that Rice, newly appointed to the rank of brigadier general for his gallantry at Gettysburg, would volunteer such information to a newspaperman.

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with several light folds. A small strip of paper in the lower left corner, presumably removed due to its containing the name of the recipient, has been professionally restored.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ROSECRANS, WILLIAM S. (1819-98)

# 6645

Union Major General – Ohio; U.S. Congressman – California – 1881-85

Rosecrans led the Army of the Cumberland at Murfreesboro and through the Tullahoma campaign to Chickamauga, where he was routed by the Confederates under Longstreet, a misadventure which effectively ended his military career. After the war, he settled near Los Angeles, serving as U.S. Congressman from California, 1881 – 1885.

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with rank, “W.S. Rosecrans, Maj[or] Genl.”

There is general soiling and wear, along with a few pinholes and light creases.

OUT OF STOCK
 

RUSSELL, DAVID A. (1820-64)

# 7284

Union Brigadier General – Massachusetts; Killed-in-Action at the Battle of Winchester

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, Russell saw early-war service as colonel of the 7th Massachusetts Infantry on the Peninsula and at Antietam. After promotion to brigadier general, he saw action at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Petersburg, and at the battle of Winchester, where he was killed while leading a brigade on September 19, 1864.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “D.A. Russell, Brig. Genl.,” on a 1” x 2 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with light soiling and wear.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 6070

Union Major General - Virginia; U.S. Presidential Candidate - Whig Party - 1852

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Recommending Brevet Brigadier General Harvey Brown to War Secretary Stanton 

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, recommending an old army comrade, Colonel Harvey Brown, to War Secretary Edwin Stanton.

“N. York, Apl. 9 1862. Dear Sir: I beg to present to you Col. Harvey Brown, one of the most distinguished veterans of the army & whose last gallant achievement, at Ft. Pickens, seems to merit a special reward, like all his other services on whatever field. Col. B. has had fortune in respect to promotion which, I trust, the War Department may now be able to correct. With the highest respect, I have the honor to remain, Y[ou]r most Ob[edien]t Serv[an]t, Winfield Scott. Hon. E.M. Stanton, Sec. of War.”

A lifelong soldier, Brown had served in the Florida Seminole Wars and under Scott during the Mexican War. Having declined appointment to brigadier in the volunteer services, he was brevetted brigadier general, effective November 23, 1861, for gallant conduct in the command of Ft. Pickens, Florida during the Confederate attempts to take the Santa Rosa Island post. On April 5, 1862, Brown took command of the defenses of New York City and was later brevetted major general for his role in suppressing the Draft Riots there the following year.

Lightly and evenly toned, with small holes at corners and tape repairs to clean paper separation at the folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SCOTT, WINFIELD (1786-1866)

# 7149

Union Major General – Virginia; U.S. Army Brevet Lieutenant General for Service in the Mexican War

Scott’s Civil War role was limited to the conception of the “Anaconda Plan” for forcing the surrender of the Confederacy. Due to advanced age, he resigned from the army shortly after McClellan’s appointment to command the Army of the Potomac.

Signature, with the brevet rank Scott held from his service in the Mexican War, “Free, Winfield Scott, Lieut[enant] Genl., &c.,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” portion of an envelope front.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SEDGWICK, JOHN (1813-64)

# 6919

Union Major General - Connecticut

A West Point graduate, veteran of the Seminole and Mexican Wars, Sedgwick served with the Army of the Potomac from the Peninsula through Spotsylvania, where he was killed by a Confederate sharpshooter.

War-Date Document Signed, 3 ¾” x 8”, a manuscript pass for Lieutenant Henry J. Strait of the hard-fought 40th New York Infantry, also know as the Mozart Regiment. This early-war pass can be dated to the period before Sedgwick’s promotion to major general on July 25, 1862.

“Permission is hereby given Lieut[enant] H.J.Strait to visit Washington & Return to-day. By order of E.J. Riley, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g 40th N[ew] Y[ork] V[olunteers].  per J.H.B. Jenkins, Adj[utan]t’s Clerk. Approved, John Sedgwick, Brig[adier] Gen[era]l Vol[unteer]s.”

There is light soiling and wear, paper separation at the center intersection of the usual folds, along with minor loss of paper in the upper margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHERMAN, ELLEN BOYLE EWING (1824-88)

# 6861

Wife of Union General William Tecumseh Sherman; Daughter of Thomas Ewing – Secretary of the Treasury – 1841; Secretary of the Interior – 1849-50

Mrs. Sherman Wants to Visit Her Husband at Vicksburg, during the Campaign to Take the City

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, front and reverse of a 5” x 8” sheet, to Union General Stephen A. Hurlbut. Writing from her Ohio home, Mrs. Sherman congratulates the chronically corrupt Hurlbut on his being able to remain in the Army, her well-connected father, Thomas Ewing, having used his political influence on Hurlbut’s behalf. She further encourages Hurlbut to write a memoir, and concludes by expressing a desire to visit her husband at the Union encampment opposite Vicksburg, Mississippi, during the Federal campaign to take the river city.


Lancaster, Ohio, March 16, 1863.

Maj[or] Gen[era]l Hurlbut.

Dear Sir,

On my return home from Cincinnati, on the 14th, I received your kind letter of the 8th inst[ant]. Permit me to offer my sincere congratulations upon your triumph over those who tried to get you out of the Service. We saw with great regret the efforts that were made against you & are therefore the more rejoiced at your success. Father gave his influence and did what he could in your favor before he left Washington and he felt pretty confident that your enemies would be unsuccessful. Although you have not left the Service may we not hope for the memoir you promise? Anything from your pen would be racy & full of interest. Those who participated in the fights ought to have their turn to write about them. We have had fictions enough, but people have grown so fond of them the truth would not relish unless very well presented. Will you do me the favor to have your man Lancy or your man ‘Friday’ deliver the accompanying letter. Would you be shocked to see me come down soon? Could I get to Young’s Point?

Very truly your friend,

Ellen E. Sherman.”


Overall condition is excellent, with light, even toning and the usual folds. There are three small, symmetrical holes at mid-right, apparently made while the letter was folded.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SHERMAN, WILLIAM TECUMSEH (1820-91)

# 6886

Union Major General - Ohio

An 1840 West Point graduate, Sherman was superintendent of what is now LSU when war broke out in 1861. He resigned when Confederates seized the U.S. arsenal in Baton Rouge, shortly thereafter reentering the army. Early lack of success in Kentucky was soon offset by distinguished service at Shiloh, Vicksburg, Chattanooga, Atlanta, and in the “March to the Sea.”

Signature, with rank and date, “W.T. Sherman, General, 1888,” on the reverse of Sherman’s 2” x 3 ½” calling card.

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SICKLES, DANIEL E. (1819-1914)

# 5943

Union Major General - New York; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the Battle of Gettysburg

Sickles lost a leg and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor as a result of his action in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Typed Letter Signed, 8” x 11”, to Isaac P. Gragg, a Union veteran who saw Civil War service with the 1st and 61st Massachusetts Volunteers, accepting an invitation to attend a ceremony dedicating a statue of Union General Joseph Hooker.

“23 Fifth Ave., New York, May 19, 1903. Capt. Isaac P. Gragg, Secretary, etc, Room 453, State House, Boston. Captain: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of an invitation, conveyed by you in behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, to attend the dedication of an Equestrian Statue to Major General Joseph Hooker, on Thursday, June 25th, proximo. I have much satisfaction in accepting this invitation and expect to be present on that interesting occasion. Very sincerely yours, D.E. Sickles.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few stains and the usual folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SICKLES, DANIEL E. (1819-1914)

# 6927

Union Major General - New York; Awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the Battle of Gettysburg

Sickles lost a leg and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor as a result of his action in the Peach Orchard at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863.

Signature, with rank and date, “Autograph of D.E. Sickles, Maj[or] Gen]era]l U.S. Army, New York, Jan[uar]y 11, [18]90,” on a 3 ¼” x 4 ¾” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a vertical fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SMITH, CALEB BLOOD (1808-1864)

# 6952

U.S. Interior Secretary – 1861-63

Signature, “Caleb B. Smith,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPEED, JAMES (1812-87)

# 6953

U.S. Attorney General – 1864-66

Signed Card, 1 ¼” x 3 ¼”, “James Speed.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with minor bleeding of ink at the conclusion of the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 

SPINNER, FRANCIS E. (1802-90)

# 6954

U.S. Treasurer - 1861-75; U.S. Congressman – New York – 1855-61

Signature, as U.S. Congressman, “F.E. Spinner, M[ember] C[ongress],” on a 1” x 3” slip of paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 6955

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

Signature, with the closing in another hand, Yours truly, Edwin M. Stanton,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ½” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

STANTON, EDWIN M. (1814-69)

# 7042

U.S. Secretary of War – 1862-68

President Lincoln Appoints Henry Larcom Abott a Brevet Brigadier General

War-Date Document Signed, 8” x 10,” as Secretary of War, Washington, December 2, 1864, “E.M. Stanton,” a partly printed War Department letter informing 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery Colonel Henry Larcom Abbott that he has been appointed to the rank of brevet brigadier general by President Lincoln, “…for gallant and distinguished services in the operations before Richmond and especially in the lines before Petersburg,” to rank from August 1, 1864.

A manuscript notation in the lower margin directs this letter through Army of the Potomac Commanding General George G. Meade.

Condition is very good, with light toning and the usual horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

TRUMBULL, LYMAN (1813-96)

# 6977

U.S. Senator - Illinois - 1855-73; Co-authored the Thirteenth Amendment – Prohibiting Slavery in the United States

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, as U.S. Senator from Illinois, Lyman Trumbull, Ill[inois].”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

TYNDALE, HECTOR (1821-80)

# 7038

Union Brigadier General - Pennsylvania; Returned the Body of John Brown for Burial after His Execution

At the request of his Quaker mother, Tyndale turned down an appointment to West Point to enter his father’s ceramics business. He escorted Mrs. John Brown to visit her imprisoned husband on the night before his execution, and on the trip returning his body for burial in North Elba, New York. Twice wounded, having three horses shot from under him, and being left for dead on the field at Antietam, Tynsdale resigned due to poor health on August 26, 1864.

Signature, with the rank Tyndale held from April 9, 1863 until his resignation the following year, “Hector Tyndale, Brig. Genl. U.S. Vol[unteer]s,” on a 1 ¼” x 5 ½” slip of paper; quite possibly war-date, as Tyndale resigned well before the end of the war, and was brevetted major general of volunteers on March 13, 1865.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 6958

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¾” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains and a slightly irregular upper edge.

OUT OF STOCK
 

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)

# 7051

U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69

Signature, as U.S. Navy Secretary, “Gideon Welles,” on a 1 ¼” x 3 ¾” portion of an appointment document.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a vertical crease through the signature.

OUT OF STOCK
 
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