Historical Civil War Autographs
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Civil War - The Union

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71 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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EVERETT, EDWARD (1794-1865)

# 6995

U.S. Secretary of State – 1852-53; Governor of Massachusetts – 1836-40; U.S Senator - Massachusetts

Everett preceded Lincoln at the podium on November 19, 1863, giving the principal address at the Gettysburg cemetery dedication.

Autograph Letter Signed, 6 ½” x 8”, to “Mrs. J.L. Payson.” From his home in Boston, Everett amusingly responds to a request for autographs, presumably those of Rufus Choate, Thomas Hart Benton, and Washington Irving – no longer present with this letter.

“Summer Street, 23 Nov[ember] 1854. Dear Mrs. Payson, After my former note was written, it occurred to me to send you the autographs of Mr. Choate, and Col. Benton, in addition to that of Mr. Irving; a group certainly of which the members have nothing in common, but that they are all celebrities. With the greatest Regard, Sincerely Yours, Edward Everett.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with the expected folds. There are two tears, with no loss of paper, in the lower left corner, along with damp-staining along the right margin.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FESSENDEN, WILLIAM P. (1806-69)

# 6944

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1864-65; U.S. Senator – Maine – 1854-69

Signature, as U.S. Senator, “W.P. Fessenden, U[nited] S[tates] S[enate],” on a 1” x 3” slip paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FOOTE, ANDREW H. (1806-1863)

# 6852

Union Rear Admiral

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)  U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69


As commodore in the U.S. Navy, Foote provided naval support in the Federal operations against Forts Henry and Donelson and in the bombardment of Island #10. Promoted to rear admiral for those actions, he died shortly after being transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 1863.

As the Country Prepares for War - Just a Month Before the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter - a Union Sailor is Detached to Await Orders

Endorsement Signed, “Forwarded by A.H. Foote…March 11/[18]61,” on the reverse of the attached leaf of a Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, by Navy Secretary Gideon Welles. In an action undoubtedly replicated throughout the military, emblematic of the nation’s preparation for the Civil War that would break out just a month later, Welles orders “3rd Ass[istan]t Engineer Oscar H. Lackey, U.S. Navy, New York,” detached from his prior assignment aboard the Crusader, to await further orders:

“Navy Department, 9 March 1861. Sir, You are hereby detached from the Crusader and you will regard yourself as Waiting Orders. I am, respectfully, Your Obed[ien]t Serv[an]t, Gideon Welles...”

The letter-sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with an old clip hole in the upper margin. The integral leaf signed by Foote bears heavier soiling and wear, and contains an extremely detailed Navy Department watermark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GARFIELD, JAMES A. (1831-81)

# 6684

Twentieth U.S. President – 1881; Union Major General - Ohio

Signed Photograph, 2 ¼” x 4”, “J.A. Garfield, Ohio,a Brady carte-de-visite.

There is light soiling and wear, and the upper corners of the card have been trimmed diagonally. The ornate back-mark has been marred by past mounting.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GATES, THEODORE B. (1825-1911)

# 7231

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Lieutenant Colonel – 20th New York State Militia; Union Colonel – 80th New York Infantry

War-Date Autograph Endorsement Signed, on a 2 ¼” x 3 ¼” slip of paper, removed from a larger document. “H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 20th N.Y. S[tate] M[ilitia], Brookes Station, Va., May 11, 1863. Respectfully forwarded & cordially recommended, Theodore B. Gates, Col[onel] Com[man]d[in]g.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

GEARY, JOHN W. (1819-1873)

# 7022

Union Brigadier General – Pennsylvania; First Mayor of San Francisco, California – 1850-51; Governor of Kansas Territory – 1856-57; Governor of Pennsylvania – 1867-73

A veteran of the Mexican War, Geary began the Civil War as Colonel of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry. He was twice wounded at Cedar Mountain, commanded the 2nd Division of the 12th Corps at Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and subsequently saw action at Chattanooga. After the war, Geary served two terms as Governor of Pennsylvania.

War-Date Signature, with rank, “Jno. W. Geary, Brig. Genl. Com[man]d[in]g,” on a 1 ¼” x 4” slip of paper, removed from a larger document or letter.

Lightly and evenly toned, with a few small stains, along with old glue staining on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GRANT, ULYSSES S. (1822-85)

# 7027

18th U.S. President - 1869-77; Union Lieutenant General

From Vicksburg, Grant Exerts His Authority Over the Mississippi, in an Incident with the Steamer Empress – Later Burned by Nathan Bedford Forrest

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 1 ½ pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded 5” x 8” letter-sheet, to a United States Treasury agent identified only as “Mr. Montrose.”

From his headquarters in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Confederate river stronghold having fallen to Federal forces under Grant just three months earlier, the Union commander informs Agent Montrose of the improper seizure of a cotton-laden steamer on the river by the U.S. Navy. As unhindered shipping on the Mississippi had resumed after the mid-summer fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, Montrose is further instructed to provide passes for use by Union vessels as additional protection against future seizures in violation of orders already issued by Grant.


“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs Dep[artmen]t of the Ten[nessee], Vicksburg, Miss[issippi], Oct[ober] 6th 1863. Mr. Montrose, Ag[en]t Treas[ury] Dept. Sir, The gentlemen with Gen[eral] Stewart, the bearer of this, have all shipped Cotton on the Steamer Empress, from Natchez, Miss[issippi] in conformity with Gen[eral] Orders No. 57, current series and were stopped at the mouth of the Red river by the Navy. I have written to the Naval Commander at that place, enclosing a copy of the order referred to and presume with this the Empress will be permitted to pass. However for further security I have to request that you issue Treasury passes in addition to the Authority already granted. Yours truly, U.S. Grant, Maj[or] Gen[eral].”
Three passages from the Official Records, communications between the U.S. Navy vessels involved, provide further details of the controversy, in part:

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, October 4, 1863. Sir: This morning the steamer Empress came down from Natchez, having on board about 2,800 bales of cotton, taken on board by permission of Brigadier-General M.M. Crocker, commanding U.S. forces at Natchez…Never having received orders to pass cotton shipped by permission of army officers, and the proclamation of the President of March 31, 1863, and the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury of the same date not permitting any such trade, I ordered the captain of the Empress to return to Natchez with the cotton, and gave him a letter to General Crocker, a copy of which I enclose. I was informed by the captain of the Empress that these permits were given by General Grant…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding Third District.”

“U.S.S. Benton, Off Natchez, October 9, 1863…I was informed by my executive officer that he had forwarded a letter from General Grant to Captain Ramsay, a copy of which I send, in which the general was willing to assume the responsibility in the premises and referred to an order from the Treasury Department of September 15, 1863, which caused him to issue his General Order No. 57, which I send enclosed…Jas. A. Greer, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 4th Dist., Miss. Squadron.”

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, November 8, 1863. Captain Couthouy told them that you commanded the Mississippi River; that General Grant was absolute on shore, but that he did not control so much of the water of the Mississippi as would be sufficient for him to wash his face in; that this was no question between military and naval authority, but simply whether the officers in command of gunboats should obey your orders and those of the Secretary of the Navy or those of General Grant…A person calling himself General David Stewart (who, I was informed in Natchez, is supposed to be a cotton speculator) took it upon himself to spread a number of reports, and was the principal speaker among the passengers on the Empress…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 3rd Dist., Miss. Squadron.”


While Navy officers were still embroiled in the controversy back on the Mississippi, Grant was en route to Chattanooga just two weeks after the date of this letter to Agent Montrose, in command of the new Military Division of the Mississippi, setting the stage for the battles of Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge. Interestingly, it was later reported that the Empress was burned by Confederate cavalry forces under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Island #34 on October 28, 1864.

There is light, even toning, with the usual folds, several small stains, and somewhat heavier soiling and wear to the docketed fourth page of the letter-sheet. Slight trimming of the margins, perhaps inadvertent when the envelope in which the letter was delivered was opened, affects several letters of text in the last line of the first page and in the first word of the second.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GRANT, ULYSSES S. (1822-85)

# 7148

18th U.S. President - 1869-77; Union Lieutenant General

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ½”, “U.S. Grant.”

The card is lightly and evenly toned, with a barely noticeable one-eighth inch tear at the right edge and old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 6945

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signature, “H. Hamlin, Maine,” on a 2 ¾” x 4 ¾” portion of a lightly toned album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMLIN, HANNIBAL (1809-91)

# 7001

U.S. Vice President - 1861-65; Governor & U.S. Senator - Maine

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¼”, with a full signature, Hannibal Hamlin, Bangor, Ap[ri]l 18, 1891,” from Hamlin’s home in Maine, less than three months before his death.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAMMOND, JOHN (1827-89)

# 7236

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 5th New York Cavalry; U.S. Congressman – New York - 1879-83

Civil War-Date Endorsement Signed – as Major of the Fifth New York Cavalry

War-Date Endorsement Signed, on a lightly toned 2 ¼” x 3” slip of paper, removed from a larger document.

“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs 5th N.Y. Cavalry, n[ea]r Hartwood Ch[urch, Va., Sept[ember] 6, 1863. Approved recommended and respectfully forwarded. J. Hammond, Major Com[man]d[in]g.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6880

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4 ¼”, “John Hay.”

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6946

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois, and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under Presidents McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Signed Card, 2 ½” x 4”, “John Hay.”

Pristine, both front and reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAY, JOHN M. (1838-1905)

# 6714

Personal Secretary of Abraham Lincoln; U.S. Secretary of State - 1898-1905 – McKinley & Roosevelt Administrations

Hay became a friend of Lincoln while studying law in Springfield, Illinois and accompanied him to Washington to become one of his personal secretaries. After the war, Hay and Nicolay wrote their biography of Lincoln, and Hay served as Secretary of State under McKinley and Roosevelt from 1898 through 1905.

Autograph Letter Signed, two pages, on the first and third leaves of a 5 ¼” x 8” letter-sheet. Addressing former Union General Frederick Tracy Dent, brother-in-law and secretary of President Ulysses S. Grant, Hay seeks the help of the President in securing his brother’s advancement in the military.

New York, August 31 [no year]. My Dear General Dent, Enclosed you will find the note to the President which you suggested I should write. My brother Lieutenant Leonard Hay is Adjutant of the 9th Infantry. He likes the service and desires to remain in it. I know him to be a very efficient and valuable officer and if you can do anything to promote his wishes, I am sure it will be to the advantage of the service, and will lay me under great personal obligations. I am very faithfully yours, John Hay. P.S. My address will be for the present ‘Republican Office, Chicago’ where I am always at your disposition.”

Beneath Hay’s closing and signature, General Dent has written and initialed a biographical notation of Hay, in pencil, “Private Sec[retary] of President Lincoln and author of Jim Beldsoe & little breeches. F.T.D.”

The letter-sheet bears the usual light toning, and there is weakness and clean separation, with no loss of paper, at the edges of two horizontal folds. The text of the letter is unaffected by a three-quarter inch area of paper loss in the upper margin of the second page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 6859

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Signature, with date and sentiment, “…1st Sept[ember] 1867. Sincerely, R.B. Hayes,” on a 5” x 5 ½” sheet of lined paper, for “Wm. A. Baker, Auburn, N.Y.

The sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with minor show-through from old glue staining on the reverse, and there are two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 7554

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Signed Card, 2 ¼” x 3 ¾”, with a desirable full signature, “Rutherford B. Hayes.” On the reverse is the notation “2-28-[18]91, R.B. Hayes,” presumably in the hand of the collector who obtained the autograph.

The card is lightly and evenly toned, and there are old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 7654

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Governor of Ohio – 1868-72 & 1876-77; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Document Signed, 7 ¾” x 10”, as U.S. President, a partly printed “affix the seal” document.


“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a Warrant for the pardon of John B. Martin, dated this day and signed by me; and for so doing this shall be his warrant. R.B. Hayes. Washington, 9th Aug[u]st, 1877.”
In excellent condition overall, the document is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds.

Price: $550.00
Quantity: 
 

HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL, JR. (1841-1935)

# 6786

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice– 1902-32; Civil War Union Captain – 20th Massachusetts Infantry

Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 6 ½”, to “Mrs. Carl C. Wheaton.” As U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, Holmes cordially complies with an autograph request, signing in full at the conclusion.

Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, September 5, 1930. My dear Mrs. Wheaton, Presence here will prevent my accepting your kind offer to show me your autograph book, but it gives me pleasure to comply with your slight request that I add to it and join so distinguished a company. Very Truly Yours, Oliver Wendell Holmes.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few unobtrusive stains and a horizontal fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HUNTER, MORTON C. (1825-96)

# 7240

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 82nd Indiana Infantry

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from Indiana, “Morton C. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana,” on a 2 ½” x 6” portion of an album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LEE, SAMUEL P. (1812-97)

# 6870

Union Rear Admiral

A distant cousin of Robert E. Lee, Samuel P. Lee remained loyal to the Union when war erupted in 1861. He commanded numerous ships during the course of the war, most notably on blockade duty, from which he received more than $100,000 in prize money for the capture of Confederate blockade runners.

Letter Signed, 8” x 13 ½”. As commander of the North Atlantic Fleet in Key West, Florida, Lee directs Commodore Joseph F. Green in the use of coal for U.S. Navy vessels at St. Thomas, due to the expiration of a contract for its receipt and storage.

“U.S.S. Severn (2nd Rate), Key West, Fl[orid]a, February 13th 1871. Commodore Joseph F. Green, U.S.A., Commander of Squadron, North Atlantic Fleet, or Senior Naval Officer in Dominican Waters. Sir, The Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting under date of January 24th 1871 informs me that as it intends to discontinue its contract with Mrs. Johanna Gordon, from and after the 24th June next, (the date of its expiration) for the receiving, storing &c. of the Government coal at St. Thomas, it is desirable that the stock of Coal on hand (263 tons) as per report of 25 Dec[ember] 1870, should be used up before the expiration of the contract. Please therefore give such directions to cruisers under your command, as will accomplish this object. When the stock of Coal on hand has been used up, Coal may be bought at ‘St. Thomas,’ to the best interests of the Government, whenever required by cruisers touching at that port. Respectfully Yours, S.P.Lee, Rear Admiral Com[mandin]g N[orth] A[tlantic] Fleet.”

The letter has three horizontal folds, and there is a diagonal break, with no loss of paper, at center left. A strip of old paper backing along the left edge is still present.

OUT OF STOCK
 
71 Items.  Showing Items 21 thru 40.
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