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49 Items.  Showing Items 1 thru 20.
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BANKS, NATHANIEL P. (1816-94) Union Major General – Massachusetts; Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives – 1855-57; Governor of Massachusetts – 1858-61

# 8290

After being routed by Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah Valley campaign and the battle of Cedar Mountain in 1862, Banks commanded during the campaign and subsequent surrender of Port Hudson, Louisiana. A longtime politician from Massachusetts, he was elected to multiple terms in Congress, both before and after the war. 

Civil War-Date Letter Signed, one page, 7 ¾” x 9 ¾”.  Writing to “General Thomas Hillhouse, Adjutant General, State of New York,” Banks requests information relating to troops for his upcoming assignment as commander of the Department of the Gulf in New Orleans.

“Albany, Nov[ember] 1st 1862…General, I will esteem it a favor if you will notify me at Astor House, New York by telegraph of the time of the departure and probable arrival at New York of the Regiments for my expedition.  Instructions have been given to provide suitable camp ground and supplies.  I am General, With Much Respect, Your Ob[e]d[ien]t Serv[an]t, N.P. Banks, M[ajor] G[eneral] C[ommanding].

Lightly and evenly toned, with clean paper separation at several of the expected folds.

Price: $325.00
Quantity: 
 

CANBY, EDWARD R.S. (1817-73)

# 7817

Union Major General

A veteran of the Mexican and Second Seminole Wars, Canby served in New Mexico in opposition to Confederate General Henry H. Sibley during the American Civil War. Subsequently transferred east, he took command of the Military Division of West Mississippi and was involved in the late-war actions at Mobile, Alabama. In 1873, he was killed by Modoc Indians in California.

Document Signed, an endorsement on the reverse of an imprinted 9 ¾” x 16 ¼” U.S. Army form, “Examined & approved, Ed. R.S. Canby, M[ajor] G[eneral] Com[mandin]g,” approving expenditures for the month of November 1867.

The document is in excellent overall condition, with the expected folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

ELLSWORTH, EPHRAIM ELMER (1837-61)

# 7024

Union Colonel – Raised the 11th New York Infantry – “Ellsworth’s Fire Zouaves”

A personal friend of President Lincoln, Ellsworth became an instant hero to the Union when he was shot by proprietor James T. Jackson while removing the Confederate flag from the Marshall House Tavern in Alexandria, Virginia on May 24, 1861. Jackson was, in turn, immediately shot and killed by Zouave Private Francis E. Brownell, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the action.

Signed Card, 2” x 3 ½”, with initials, "E.E.E.,” on the reverse of a Terpsichorean Club card of the U.S. Zouave Cadets, probably relating to a formal dance sponsored by the unit.

The card is accompanied by a printed forty-page booklet, 3 ½” x 5 ¼”, enumerating the terms of drill and many other details of the Zouaves’ history and of their “Proposed Tour of the United States.” Strictly drilled and held to the most rigorous standards of military and personal discipline, their gaudy uniforms fashioned after those of the French colonial troops in Algeria, the unit achieved national renown as an exhibition while touring the northeastern United States.

The text of the back cover, Chicago, Ill., Sept, 20th 1859,” along with several pages of press notices dating from mid 1859 through May 1860, associate the booklet and card to Ellsworth’s time in Illinois, where he trained the Chicago National Guard Cadets, later known as the U.S. Zouave Cadets. Having studied in the law office of Abraham Lincoln during his time in Illinois, Ellsworth became a personal friend of the Lincoln family. He campaigned tirelessly for Lincoln in the election of 1860, and accompanied the new President to Washington, D.C. for the inauguration.

Both pieces bear general soiling and wear; having heavier staining on the covers, the booklet contains all its original pages, legible and unmarred.

OUT OF STOCK
 

FOOTE, ANDREW H. (1806-1863)

# 6852

Union Rear Admiral

WELLES, GIDEON (1802-78)  U.S. Secretary of the Navy - 1861-69


As commodore in the U.S. Navy, Foote provided naval support in the Federal operations against Forts Henry and Donelson and in the bombardment of Island #10. Promoted to rear admiral for those actions, he died shortly after being transferred to the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron in 1863.

As the Country Prepares for War - Just a Month Before the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter - a Union Sailor is Detached to Await Orders

Endorsement Signed, “Forwarded by A.H. Foote…March 11/[18]61,” on the reverse of the attached leaf of a Letter Signed, 8” x 10”, by Navy Secretary Gideon Welles. In an action undoubtedly replicated throughout the military, emblematic of the nation’s preparation for the Civil War that would break out just a month later, Welles orders “3rd Ass[istan]t Engineer Oscar H. Lackey, U.S. Navy, New York,” detached from his prior assignment aboard the Crusader, to await further orders:

“Navy Department, 9 March 1861. Sir, You are hereby detached from the Crusader and you will regard yourself as Waiting Orders. I am, respectfully, Your Obed[ien]t Serv[an]t, Gideon Welles...”

The letter-sheet is lightly and evenly toned, with an old clip hole in the upper margin. The integral leaf signed by Foote bears heavier soiling and wear, and contains an extremely detailed Navy Department watermark.

OUT OF STOCK
 

GRANT, ULYSSES S. (1822-85)

# 7027

18th U.S. President - 1869-77; Union Lieutenant General

From Vicksburg, Grant Exerts His Authority Over the Mississippi, in an Incident with the Steamer Empress – Later Burned by Nathan Bedford Forrest

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, 1 ½ pages, front and reverse of the first leaf of a folded 5” x 8” letter-sheet, to a United States Treasury agent identified only as “Mr. Montrose.”

From his headquarters in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Confederate river stronghold having fallen to Federal forces under Grant just three months earlier, the Union commander informs Agent Montrose of the improper seizure of a cotton-laden steamer on the river by the U.S. Navy. As unhindered shipping on the Mississippi had resumed after the mid-summer fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, Montrose is further instructed to provide passes for use by Union vessels as additional protection against future seizures in violation of orders already issued by Grant.


“H[ea]d Q[uarte]rs Dep[artmen]t of the Ten[nessee], Vicksburg, Miss[issippi], Oct[ober] 6th 1863. Mr. Montrose, Ag[en]t Treas[ury] Dept. Sir, The gentlemen with Gen[eral] Stewart, the bearer of this, have all shipped Cotton on the Steamer Empress, from Natchez, Miss[issippi] in conformity with Gen[eral] Orders No. 57, current series and were stopped at the mouth of the Red river by the Navy. I have written to the Naval Commander at that place, enclosing a copy of the order referred to and presume with this the Empress will be permitted to pass. However for further security I have to request that you issue Treasury passes in addition to the Authority already granted. Yours truly, U.S. Grant, Maj[or] Gen[eral].”
Three passages from the Official Records, communications between the U.S. Navy vessels involved, provide further details of the controversy, in part:

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, October 4, 1863. Sir: This morning the steamer Empress came down from Natchez, having on board about 2,800 bales of cotton, taken on board by permission of Brigadier-General M.M. Crocker, commanding U.S. forces at Natchez…Never having received orders to pass cotton shipped by permission of army officers, and the proclamation of the President of March 31, 1863, and the regulations of the Secretary of the Treasury of the same date not permitting any such trade, I ordered the captain of the Empress to return to Natchez with the cotton, and gave him a letter to General Crocker, a copy of which I enclose. I was informed by the captain of the Empress that these permits were given by General Grant…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Commanding Third District.”

“U.S.S. Benton, Off Natchez, October 9, 1863…I was informed by my executive officer that he had forwarded a letter from General Grant to Captain Ramsay, a copy of which I send, in which the general was willing to assume the responsibility in the premises and referred to an order from the Treasury Department of September 15, 1863, which caused him to issue his General Order No. 57, which I send enclosed…Jas. A. Greer, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 4th Dist., Miss. Squadron.”

“U.S.S. Choctaw, Off Mouth of Red River, November 8, 1863. Captain Couthouy told them that you commanded the Mississippi River; that General Grant was absolute on shore, but that he did not control so much of the water of the Mississippi as would be sufficient for him to wash his face in; that this was no question between military and naval authority, but simply whether the officers in command of gunboats should obey your orders and those of the Secretary of the Navy or those of General Grant…A person calling himself General David Stewart (who, I was informed in Natchez, is supposed to be a cotton speculator) took it upon himself to spread a number of reports, and was the principal speaker among the passengers on the Empress…Frank M. Ramsay, Lieutenant-Commander, Comdg. 3rd Dist., Miss. Squadron.”


While Navy officers were still embroiled in the controversy back on the Mississippi, Grant was en route to Chattanooga just two weeks after the date of this letter to Agent Montrose, in command of the new Military Division of the Mississippi, setting the stage for the battles of Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain, and Missionary Ridge. Interestingly, it was later reported that the Empress was burned by Confederate cavalry forces under Nathan Bedford Forrest at Island #34 on October 28, 1864.

There is light, even toning, with the usual folds, several small stains, and somewhat heavier soiling and wear to the docketed fourth page of the letter-sheet. Slight trimming of the margins, perhaps inadvertent when the envelope in which the letter was delivered was opened, affects several letters of text in the last line of the first page and in the first word of the second.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HAYES, RUTHERFORD B. (1822-93)

# 7654

Nineteenth U.S. President - 1877-81; Governor of Ohio – 1868-72 & 1876-77; Union Brigadier General - Ohio

Document Signed, 7 ¾” x 10”, as U.S. President, a partly printed “affix the seal” document.


“I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a Warrant for the pardon of John B. Martin, dated this day and signed by me; and for so doing this shall be his warrant. R.B. Hayes. Washington, 9th Aug[u]st, 1877.”
In excellent condition overall, the document is lightly and evenly toned, with two horizontal folds.

Price: $550.00
Quantity: 
 

HOLMES, OLIVER WENDELL, JR. (1841-1935)

# 6786

U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice– 1902-32; Civil War Union Captain – 20th Massachusetts Infantry

Autograph Letter Signed, 5” x 6 ½”, to “Mrs. Carl C. Wheaton.” As U.S. Supreme Court Associate Justice, Holmes cordially complies with an autograph request, signing in full at the conclusion.

Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, September 5, 1930. My dear Mrs. Wheaton, Presence here will prevent my accepting your kind offer to show me your autograph book, but it gives me pleasure to comply with your slight request that I add to it and join so distinguished a company. Very Truly Yours, Oliver Wendell Holmes.”

The letter is lightly and evenly toned, with a few unobtrusive stains and a horizontal fold at the center.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HOOKER, JOSEPH (1814-79) Union Major General - Massachusetts

# 8315

Hooker served in the East from the Seven Days through Chancellorsville, where he led the Army of the Potomac to defeat at the hands of Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee. 

Signature, with rank, “Joseph Hooker, Maj[or] Gen[era]l,” on a 2 ¼” x 4” slip of lined paper.

Excellent, with light, even toning.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HUNTER, DAVID (1802-86) Union Major General

# 8316

A political appointee, Hunter served with little note at First Manassas, Secessionville, and the Piedmont.  He is most remembered for burning Virginia Military Institute in 1864 and presiding at the Lincoln assassination trial. 

Signature, with rank, “D. Hunter, Maj[or] Gen[eral],” on a 2 ¼” x 5” portion of an album page.

Lightly and evenly toned.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HUNTER, MORTON C. (1825-96)

# 7240

Union Brevet Brigadier General; Union Colonel – 82nd Indiana Infantry

Signature, as U.S. Congressman from Indiana, “Morton C. Hunter, Bloomington, Indiana,” on a 2 ½” x 6” portion of an album page.

OUT OF STOCK
 

HURLBUT, WILBERFORCE LOVEJOY (1841-64) Union Captain – Fifth Michigan Infantry; Wounded at the Battle of Gettysburg, July 2, 1863; Killed-in-Action at the Battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864

# 8606

Son of abolitionist minister Thaddeus Beman Hurlbut; Named for British abolitionist William Wilberforce and Elijah P. Lovejoy, his father’s friend and business partner, murdered by a pro-slavery mob in Alton, Illinois on November 7, 1837

Original Steel Engraving, 7 ¾” x 10 ½” overall, with a printed facsimile signature beneath a 3 ¼” x 3 ¾” image of Hurlbut in military uniform, imprinted “Eng[raved] by H.B. Hall & Sons, 52 Fulton St., N.Y.”  From a biographical work, published in 1876.

Pristine.

OUT OF STOCK
 

JONES, SAMUEL J. (1836-?) Union Surgeon on the USS Minnesota, the flagship of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, during the Battle between the Monitor & Merrimack; Notable physician in Chicago, Illinois after the American Civil War

# 8908

Original Steel Engraving, 7 ¾” x 10 ½” overall, with a printed facsimile signature beneath a 3 ½” x 3 ½” image, imprinted “Eng[rave]d by H.B. Hall & Sons, 13 Barclay St., N.Y.”  From a biographical work, published in 1876.

Lightly and evenly toned, with inconsequential staining and a few light creases, mostly near the edges.

Price: $35.00
Quantity: 
 

LANE, JAMES HENRY (1814-66) Union Brigadier General – Kansas; Authorized recruitment of the 1st Kansas Volunteer Colored Infantry; U.S. Senator - Kansas - 1861-66

# 8318

An opponent of slavery, Lane gained a senate seat upon the influx of Free-Soil settlers into Kansas in the 1850s and early 1860s.  An associate of John Brown, he conducted numerous raids and skirmishes against slavery factions in the border areas of Kansas and Missouri.  His power waning in the mid and late-war years, Lane committed suicide on July 1, 1866. 

Signature, probably a free-frank removed from an envelope, as U.S. Senator, “J.H. Lane, U.S.S.,” on a ¾” x 1 ½” slip of brown paper.

OUT OF STOCK
 

LEE, SAMUEL P. (1812-97)

# 6870

Union Rear Admiral

A distant cousin of Robert E. Lee, Samuel P. Lee remained loyal to the Union when war erupted in 1861. He commanded numerous ships during the course of the war, most notably on blockade duty, from which he received more than $100,000 in prize money for the capture of Confederate blockade runners.

Letter Signed, 8” x 13 ½”. As commander of the North Atlantic Fleet in Key West, Florida, Lee directs Commodore Joseph F. Green in the use of coal for U.S. Navy vessels at St. Thomas, due to the expiration of a contract for its receipt and storage.

“U.S.S. Severn (2nd Rate), Key West, Fl[orid]a, February 13th 1871. Commodore Joseph F. Green, U.S.A., Commander of Squadron, North Atlantic Fleet, or Senior Naval Officer in Dominican Waters. Sir, The Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting under date of January 24th 1871 informs me that as it intends to discontinue its contract with Mrs. Johanna Gordon, from and after the 24th June next, (the date of its expiration) for the receiving, storing &c. of the Government coal at St. Thomas, it is desirable that the stock of Coal on hand (263 tons) as per report of 25 Dec[ember] 1870, should be used up before the expiration of the contract. Please therefore give such directions to cruisers under your command, as will accomplish this object. When the stock of Coal on hand has been used up, Coal may be bought at ‘St. Thomas,’ to the best interests of the Government, whenever required by cruisers touching at that port. Respectfully Yours, S.P.Lee, Rear Admiral Com[mandin]g N[orth] A[tlantic] Fleet.”

The letter has three horizontal folds, and there is a diagonal break, with no loss of paper, at center left. A strip of old paper backing along the left edge is still present.

OUT OF STOCK
 

MARSTON, GILMAN (1811-90)

# 6835

Union Brigadier General - New Hampshire; U.S. Congressman – New Hampshire – 1859-63 & 1865-67; U.S. Senator – New Hampshire - 1889

Marston recruited and led the 2nd New Hampshire at First Bull Run, the Peninsula, and Fredericksburg. After Gettysburg, he was assigned to establish the prison camp at Point Lookout and returned to the Army of the Potomac for the disastrous Union assault at Cold Harbor.

Marston Writes of the Hard Fighting at Drewry’s Bluff

War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, three pages, on a 5” x 8” letter-sheet. Writing to an unnamed cousin from the scene of the Union’s just-concluded attempt to take Richmond, Marston shares details of the hard fighting, and concludes with information relating to political events in his native New Hampshire. In the campaign which came to be known as Drewry’s Bluff, begun on May 6, 1864, Benjamin Butler’s Army of the James advanced overland toward Richmond from the Bermuda Hundred, just north of City Point. As indicated in this letter, the Federal Army came within six miles of the Confederate capital before being repulsed in a counterattack by troops under P.G.T. Beauregard on May 16, successfully delaying the fall of Richmond by almost a year.


“In the Field near Drewry’s Bluff, May 19, [18]64.

Friend Cousin,

Your brother in [?] wrote me to know what had become of you, but I suppose you have reported before this as Wilkinson tells me you started for home some days ago. Since I started on this campaign I have had little opportunity to hear from or write to anyone. For nearly a week I had no opportunity of sending letters if I had the time to write them. It has been the hardest kind of campaigning I have ever known. Marching, fighting, sleeping on the ground without tents, fire or even a blanket. I have several times undertaken to write a short note but before I could complete it everybody would be called to arms to repel a charge or make an attack. I have had to write orders and reports with a tree for a table while shot and shells were crashing through the branches. The rebels are pressing us about as hard as we are pressing them and last night they shelled our camps. But I imagine we shall soon reverse all this and drive them within their earthen walls about Richmond and force an entrance ourselves. The right wing of the army got within 6 or 7 miles of Richmond on the 16th but that 6 or 7 miles we shall find a much harder road to travel than that we have passed over. I have re[ceive]d only three or four letters from N.H. since I left Yorktown and not one from Washington. Probably people don’t know where I am and I hardly know myself. That it is all woods, swamps & ravines with but very little land in cultivation I know very well.

What new thing has turned up about the Senatorship – anything? Wilkinson had a letter from his brother saying Tuck was about played out & that Rollins he thought was gaining a little. I am told also that the Boston Advertiser is down on me for not supporting Joel and us not being in the front rank of republicans &c &c. That is Tuck of course. His hand may not have written the article but his mean spirit dictated it. Well, we have had to deal with these fellows before and whatever else they may do they cannot defeat us.

I should like for you to write me and let me know the present aspect of affairs.

When I will get time to write again I don’t know. My command occupies me every moment.

Yours very truly, G. Marston.

Remember me kindly to friend Gale.”


The sheets are lightly and evenly toned, with the usual horizontal folds, and there is light water staining throughout.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCLELLAN, MARY ELLEN MARCY (1836-1915)

# 5797

Wife of Union General George B. McClellan; Daughter of Union General Randolph B. Marcy

Civil War-Date Autograph Letter Signed, two pages on separate sheets of a folded 3 ½” x 5 ½” embossed personal letter-sheet, responding to a request for her husband’s autograph. 

“Mr. Renshaw – I regret that I have no note of Genl. McClellan’s that I can give away – and when asked for his autographs am obliged to send merely his signature. If this will afford you any gratification I am very happy to enclose it to you. Yours & c, M.E. McClellan. New York City, May 19th/[18]62.”

At the time, General McClellan had completed his tentative advance up the York-James Peninsula to threaten Richmond, and he had written to his wife frequently during the month-long campaign. The letters which Mrs. McClellan was unwilling to part with would have undoubtedly contained significant insight into both the movement of the Army of the Potomac and her husband’s frustration at the continuous urging of President Lincoln for more aggressive action against the outnumbered Confederate defenders.

Lightly and evenly toned, with several light folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McCULLOCH, HUGH (1808-95)

# 6949

U.S. Treasury Secretary – 1865-69 & 1884-85

Signature, “Hugh McCulloch,” on a 2 ¼” x 4” slip of paper. A small image is affixed to the lower left corner; the signature is, in turn, mounted to a 5 ½” x 8 ½” album page, with the notation, “Secretary of the Treasury 1867,” in another hand above.

The signed slip is lightly and evenly toned. The larger album page has several chips and binding holes along the left edge, along with two horizontal folds.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McDOWELL, IRVIN (1818-85) Union Major General - Ohio

# 8322

A West Point graduate and Mexican War veteran, McDowell led the Federal Army in its disastrous defeat at First Manassas, the first major land battle of the Civil War.  He led a corps under John Pope at Second Manassas the following year, with a similar outcome.  Subsequently transferred, McDowell commanded the Department of the Pacific and several other posts both during and after the war.

Signed Card, 1 ¾” x 3”, with rank, “Irvin McDowell, Maj[or] Gen[era]l.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with old mounting remnants on the reverse.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McKINLEY WILLIAM (1843-1901) Twenty-Fifth U.S. President - 1897-1901; Governor of Ohio – 1892-96; U.S. Congressman – Ohio – 1877-91

# 8323

Signature, “W. McKinley, Jr.,” as return addressee in the upper left corner of an envelope, also addressed by McKinley, to “J.N. Taylor, Esq[uire] of Knowles, Taylor & K…, East Liverpool, Ohio.” 

Evenly toned, with general soiling and wear; some smearing of ink in the postal markings; minor bleeding of ink at the conclusion of McKinley’s signature and portions of the address.

OUT OF STOCK
 

McNEIL, JOHN (1813-91) Union Brigadier General – Missouri; Commander of the District of Northeast Missouri, Most Remembered for His Role in the Palmyra Massacre

# 7901

Original Steel Engraving, 7 ¼” x 10 ½” overall, with a printed facsimile signature beneath a 4 ½” x 5” image of McNeil in military uniform, imprinted “Photo by Hoelke & Benecke. Engraved by J.C Buttre.”

Lightly and evenly toned, with several small stains.

OUT OF STOCK
 
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